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The term "Civil Service Act” refers to an act of Congress “to regulate and im It prove the Civil Service of the United States,” approved January 16, 1883, which gav || the power to the President to appoint, by and , with the advice and consent of tho # Senate, three persons, not more than two of whom shall be adherents of the sam if party, as a commission, with authority to prescribe regulations in pursuance of an it for the execution of the provisions of the rules and of the Civil Service Act. The ac requires that the rules shall provide among other things for open competitive exam ination 5 sor testing fitness of applicants for the public service, the filling of classifie. positions by selections from among those passing with highest grades, an apportion ment of appointments in the departments at Washington among the States and Terri | tories, a period of probation before absolute appointment, and the probibition of th His use of official authority to coerce the political action of any person or body. The ac| also provides for investigations touching the enforcement of the rules promulgated arid forbids, under penalty of fine or imprisonment, or both, the solicitation by any person in the service of the United States of contributions to be used for politica purposes from persons in such service, or the collection of such contributions by any person in a government building. The terms used in the regulations are: “Classified Service,” referring to all thal || part of the executive Civil Service of the United States included within the provisions of the act; “Grade,” referring to a group of employes or positions in the classified service arranged upon a basis of duties performed without regard to salaries received ; ; “‘Class,” referring to a group of employes or positions in any grade arranged upon || the basis of salaries received, and “Excepted Position,” referring to any position || within the provisions of the Civil Service Act, but excepted from the requirement of competitive examination or registration for appointment thereto. ~ * a. The Executive Civil Service in 1905 embraced nearly 300,000 positions, with a pay- || roll of about $160,000,000. One hundred and seventy-one thousand eight hundred and seven positions are subject to competitive examination tonder the civil service act and rules. Of the holders of positions not subject to cornnetition nearly §§ are H | postmasters, 4,500 pension examining surgeons, about 3,000 Indians in minor posi-] tions in the Indian service, and about 7,000 nominees subject to confirmation by the | Senate. Exarninations are also now prescribed for the consular service under a # board in the State Department outside the civil service rules. o Examinations are held in every State fund Territory at least twice a year. | They relate as nearly as possible to the duties to be performed and, wherever prac- ticable, include practical tests. No one is certified for ap# Admissions pointment whose standing in any, examination is , less than 70 || if and Removals. per on; except soldiers and sailors having preference under || . . ." . . . Section 1,754 of the . Revised Statutes, who need obtain but 65 || # per cent. A certificate 13 given to each person examined, stating whether he or she If passed or failed to pass. Upon requisition of an appointing officer, the commission || || Kertifies the names of three eligibles for, the position, desired to be filled, and from the | eiigibles thus certified selections are made. Provision is also made in the rules for the # fifting of positions by promotion, reduction, reinstatement, or transfer. The revision of the rules promulgated by President R 3dsevelt on March 20, 1903 | contains this limitation on the power of removal: “No person, shall be removed from a competitive position, except for such cause, as will promote the essiciency of the public service, and for reasons given, in writing, and the person, whose removal, is sought shall have notice and be furnished a copy thereof, and be allowed a reasonable || If time for personally answering the same in writing; but no examination of witnesses | |, or any trial or hearing shall be required except in the discretion of the officer, mak: . | ing the removal, Copy of such, reasons, notice and answer, and of , the order of | removal, shall be roade a part of the records of the proper, department or office. as | shat! also the reasons for any change in rank or compensation, and the commission || ghaii upon request be furnished with copies or the origina is thereof.” On October 17, 1905, President Roosevelt issued an order modifying the conditions of removal as follows: “When the President or head of an executive depart- || ment is satisfied that an officer or employe in the classified service is inefficient or iopatie, and that the public service will be materially improved by his removal, such removal will bo made without hearing; but the cause of removal shall be stated in writing and filed. When misconduct is committed in the view and presence of || || the President or head of executive department, removal may be made summarshy || is and hout notice.” and o: ão atso forbid any person frt the executive Civil Service. ‘‘to use his official d | authority or insiuence for the purpose of interfering with an election or affecting the . | result thereof.” They provide that no discrimination shall be exercised, tnreatened to or promised ov, any person in the executive, Giyil Service, against or in favor, of an || applicant, eligible Cr &mploye in the classified service because of his political or || jś opinions or affiliations. Persons who served in the militäry or naval service || of the United States and were discharged by roason of disabilities resulting from Jounds or sickness incurred in the line of daty have under the rules a certain prefer - || go. They are released from all maximum ağe limitation, are Gligible for appoint-- || o -: 6% - ...ho. *, o: officers before non-veterans. By two exacutive Orders, one of | joiv :* 1962 on the other of March 26, 1903, President, Rooeyelt directed that ap- || '...e.”...to; inciassified laborers in departments in Washington be made it;.

- * - e f #: With registration tests for fitness, and extended those tests to laborers and

(while all others are obliged to obtain a grade of 70), and are || \ - POSTAL LAws AND RATES. 99

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agreed on by heads of departments and the Civil Service Commission. In the fiscal :a: ** 148,730 persons were examined, 116,019 passed and 40,923 were appointed O Offic Q. . . In addition to the home service, the commission, holds examinations for positions in the Isthmus of Panama Canal zone, in the Philippines, Porto Rico and Hawaii. j Besides examinations for positions in the classified service, the commission also holds. examinations for entrance to the Naval Academy, the municipal government of the | D1strict of Columbia, including the office of the Recorder of Deeds, and for mere laborers in the departments at Washington and in the large cities of the Country. | In pursuance of an act of Congress approved April 12, 1900, the civil authority of the United States Bucceeded the military in Porto Rico. Inasmuch as the ex

\ workmen in the government employment in such other large cities as might be

ecutive Officers and employes under this act became a part of In Porto Rico the executive Civil Service of the United States they were and Hawaii. held to corne Within the operations of the Civil Service act

and rules. There are approximately 301 sederal positions, of which 1:12 are so;)).ject to competitive educational éxamination, 81 subject to &ompetitive registration, 20 are excepted and 48 are not subject to classification. In Hawaii the same classes of positions are enbraced within the classified Civil Service as are included in that service in Öther TerritoricS. On September 19, 1900, the TJnited States Philippine Conn mission passed an “act sor the establishment and maintenance of an efficient and honest Civil Service in the Philippiné Islands.” The act provides for a Civil Ser—

* w rules for appointments and promotions according to merit || and by competitive examination as, far as practicable. The act applies with few exceptions to all appointments - of civilia]]'s to positions under the civil government, and vacancies in the highest pogitions must be filled by promotion. On November 30, 1900, the President issued an order directing the United States Civil Service Com— mission to render such assistance as may be practicable to the Philippine Civil Ser— vice Board. In accordance with this Order the cominission, examined 1,174 persons for the Philippine service during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1902, and 534 during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1903 . These examinations were for positions re

appointed to all positions for which , they are competent. The revised Civil Service rules provide that those who enter the Philippine Service are eligible for transfer to the borne service after three years', employment in the Philippines, . On June 30, 1908, there were 2,777 Americans in the Philippine civil Service.

POSTAJ, FAWS-GENERAL POSTAL INFORMATION.

Classes of Domestic Maíl Matter.—Domestic mail is divided into four classes, as follow S : - -

First Class—Letters, postal cards, private mailing cards and matter wholly or partly in writing, whether sealed or unsealed (except manuscript copy accompanying proof sheets or corrected proof sheets of the same), and all matter sealed or otherwise closed against inspection. Rates of postage—Two cents per ounce or fraction thereof. Postal cards, one cent each. “Post Cards” with written messages, conforming approximately to government postal cards in quality and weight and to the regulations prescribed by the Postmaster General, one cent each. On “drop” letters, two cents per ounce or fraction thereof, when mailed at letter carrier offices, or when mailed at Offices which are not letter carrier offices, if rural free delivery has been established and the persons addressed can be served by rural carrier. The only drop letters entitled to the one cent drop letter rate of postage are those deposited in postoffices where neither letter carrier hor rural delivery ser– vice has been established alld those deposited in postoffices where rural .6elivery ser– vice has been establish-ed, and the persons, addressed eaninot be served by rural carrier, because they reside beyond the limits of the rural delivery service.

Second Class–Newspapers and publications issued at stated intervals as often as

a known office of publication, and, formed of printed paper sheets, without boa.j cloth, leather or other substantial binding. Such publications must be originated and published for the dissemination of information of , a public character, or devoted to literature, the sciences, art, or some special, industry. They must have a legitimate list of subscribers equal, to 50 per cent of the number of copies regularly issued o circulated, and must not be designed primarily for advertising purposes, or for o circulation, or at nominal rates, or have the characteristies of books. Rate of post.

than publishers and news agents, one cent for each four ounces or fraction thereof

Third Class—Books, periodicals and matter wholly in print (not included in second class), proof sheets, corrected proo’, sheets and manuscript copy accompanying the same. Rate of postage—Qne, cent for each two ounces or fraction thereof. Seeds,

scions, cuttings, roots and plants, and also, correspondence of the bind printed ;

raised characters, and sent unsealed, are mailable at third class rates, +.
of the date, name of the addressee and sender in writing does not *::::::
of a circular to the third class. -
Fourth Class-Mer handise, namely, all matter not, embraced in the other
three classes, and which is not in its form, or nature liable to destroy, defa. .

otherwise damage the Sontents of the mail bag, or hagim the person of any one

engaged in the postal service, and not above the weight proviàed b
of postage—One cent per ounce or fraction thereof, 19 y law, Rate

In the Philippines. Vice - Board of three persons, which is authorized to prepare || quiring professional, technical, Scientific or Special clerical ability, as natives are

four times a year, bearing a date Of issue and numbered consecutively, issued from

age—For publishers and news agents, one cent a pound or fraction thereof. For others ||

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Payment of Postage.—Or, first class matter the - 3. "Loe - postage should be full ro : paid, but if two cents in stamps be affixed the matter .# be dispatched on"tie

deficient postage rated thereon, to be collected of addressee before delivery, Pa.

- - ovoi i v A. l. Ay s Clcages Cof sirst ClàSS matter exceeding four (4) pounds in weight must be fully oreo §. letters and packages of 11rst class matter Weighing less than four (4) pounds whor,

prepaid one full letter rate will be dispatched on d the desiciency collected of the # #| addressee. The fee is 8 cents, in addition to postage, and must iors; *"opo o: £inait of Weight.—A package must not exceed four pounds in weight, unless ||

it be a single book, Second class Imatter and fully prepaid first class snatter are not

| subject to the, four pound limitation.

egistry System.—All mailable matter may be registered if fully prepaid with

ordinary postage stamps, but not matter addressed to sictitious names, , other than : legitimaate trade names, initials, or box numbers, or bearing vague and indefinite

addresses. The registry see is eight cerits, in addition to the postage, both of which must in variably be prepaid.

Moneye Order System.—Fees for money orders are as follows: 3 cents to 30 | cents for orders on Lemestio form payable in the United States and Island, pos-i: sessions (Porto Rico, Hawaii, Guam and the Philippine Islands), the United States Postal Agency at Shanghai, in, Canada, Cuba and Newfoundland, and, in Barba-li dos, Grenada, St. Lucia, and St. Vincent (West Indies) ; 8 cents to 50 cents for ||

International orders payable in Austria, Bahairmas, Belgium, Bermuda, Bolivia. British Guiana, British Honduras, Chili, Costa. Itica, Denmark, Egypt, 'Hungary, Jaimaica, Japan, Leeward Islands, Liberia, Luxemburg, Mexico, Netherlands, New

Zealand, Norway, Peru, Sweden, Switzerland, Transvaal and Trinidad; 10 cents !

to $1 for International orders payable in Apia (Samoa.}, Cape Colony, , Franc Germany, Great Britain, Greece, Honduras . (Republic), Hoooo. Hai. §.

South Wales, Portugal, Queensland, Russia, Salvador, South Australia, Tasmania. : and victoria. The raaximum amount of a single order is $100. International money orders may be issued up to $100, Which , is the maximum, except for or- | diers issued and payable in Cape Colony, for which the maximum amount is $50. H

Postal Conventions.—Postal Conventions are now in operation for the exchange

of money orders between the United States and, the following countries; Great #

joritain, owitzerland, Germany, France, Italy, Canada, Newfoundland, Jamaica, New

§§§to “Waies, victoria, New-Zealand, Queensland, Cape Colony, Windward Islands

(Barbados, Grenada, St. Vincent, and , St. Locła), Leeward Islands (Antigua, St. ğıristophéo-Nevis, Îoominica. Montserot and the Virgin Islands), Belgium, "ortugal àojīn; the Azores and Madeiro " ... .o. Sweden. Noway, Japao, Denmark. Nolands. Bahama Islands, Trinidad and Tobago; Austria–Hungary, British Guiana, Luxembourg, Derrmuda, South Australia, Salvador, Chili, Honduras, Egypt, Hong Kong, Ioritish Honduraş, Cuba. Russia. Mexico, Bolivia, Apia (Samoa), Costa Rica, Creece, Liberia, Peru and the Transvaal. §ocial Delivery.—The regulations, going “rapid" or “special delivery" provide that any article of mailable matter bearing, a 10g, special delivery stamp, in Addition to the lawsul postage, is entitled to immediate delivery On its arrival at any

tonited States postoffice the free delivery clas; - - - arrival of the last mall, provided this be not later, than 9 p.m.; if the office be other than a free delivery office. To entitle such a letter to immediate delivery the resijoe or place of business of the addressee must he within the regular letter carrier loits of "a free delivery offloé, and within one mile of any other office. Special

jëivery articles are also derivered by rural carriers to bona fide patrons of their

routes (those who hav? erected approved boxes), provided they live not excoeding one mife from the routo. Special delivery stamps are not available for the pay...at "of postage, not can ordinary postage stamps b-e U.S&d to Securé in mediate jelivery of mail matter. riv * w * ore1gn Poś8ge Rates.—The rates of postage to all L, foreign -çountries and colonies (except Canada, dio ouncé), 5c.; postal Card other printed matter, of , e of it, counces, 5c.; packets, in o. of 10 ounces, for cach 2 ounces or fraction theroos,

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of 4 ounces, for ea.G
other articles, 82.
Ordinary letters for
warded whether any, Poś
most be prepaid, at * -- - - -- *
Gallada, Cuba, Panama 9. Mexico is subject

s, each, 2d.; double postal cards, each, 4c. : newspapers and

any foreign country (except Canada and Mexico) must be sortage is prepaid on them or not, All, other Inalilahle II, atter

required upon , all registered articles; and postage upon all articles other than letters is required to be prepaid, at least in part. If the postage is not prepaid in full, double the amount of the deficiency. Yo be collected of the addressec when the article to

ate on “commercial papers" per 2 ounces is the same as for ‘‘printed

ivered. The T *::::: except that the lowest gorge Co., oy package, whatever its weight, is 5c

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stic mails are admitte §ood between the United States and the United States fostal Agency 8.

Articies addressed for delivery at the following places in China. namely: Chefoo,

26tween the hours of 7 a. m. and ii p. ni., if the office be of i and between the hours of 7 a. Th, and 7 p. In , , and to the ji

Cuba, Panarna and Mexico), are as follows: Letters 15 grams
2 ounces, ic. Commercial papers: Packets not in excess ||

Sarnpie' of merchandise packets not in excess of 4 ounces, 2c.; packets in excess || * 2 ounces or fraction thereof, ic. Registration fee on letters or ||

leagt partially, Matter massed in the United States addressed to.; * to the same postage rates, and Conditions | as it would be if it were addressed for delivery in the United States. Fulk prepayment is #

chandise per 2 ounces is also the same as for “printed which are admitted to the United States | a, at our domestic postage rates and conditions, to the #

..? hih9. o Shanghai, C (Yentai), Chin-Kiang, Chung—King, Hankow, Hang-Chow. Tehang, || £inkiang, Nanking, Now—Chwang, Ningpo, Otirga, Peking, Shaiag- ||

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Agency at Shanghai; but at places other than Shanghai additional charges for postage

may be cos lected Qs the addressees trpor; the delivery of the articles. Parcels Hoost,--The first parcels post convention between the United States and

2ny Country in Europe was signed between the T ofted States and Gerroën Y on August

by nearls of which articles of merchandise may be exchanged by mail between the two countries, provided thcy are put up in packages which do not exceed 4 pourids 6

many on parcels sor the United States is fixed at 1 mark 40 pfennigs a parcel, what-

| ever its weight. Provision is made for gustoms declaration and payment. The Unsted

States had parcers post conventions with scveral countries in Central and South America and the West India Islands, but this was the first eonvention made with

Postmaster General to make such conventions by and With the advice arid consent of the President.

which are possessions of the United States), or from one to ar, other of these islands, is subject to the United States domestie classification, conditions and rates of postage.

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{}nited States, or . District or Supreme Court of the Territories, or a conrt of record

two years before his admission, that it is bona fide, his intention to become a citize of the United States, and to renounce forever, all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign

oy subject.

admission he must also declare on oath, before some one of the courts above specified “that he will support the Constitution of the United States, and that be absolutely and entirely renoumees and abjures all allegiance , and fiderity to every foreign prince, potentate, State or sovereignty, and particularly, . by name, to the prince, potentate, $tate or sov ereignty of which he was before a eitizen or subject.”

Counslitions of Citizenship--It must appear to the satisfaction of the court to which the alien has applied for sonal admission that he has resided continuousiy within the I’mited States for at least five years, and in the State or Territory where the court is held at Feast one year, and that, during that time “he has behaved as a man of good moral character, attached to the principles of tho Constitution of the United States, and well disposed to the good order and happiness of the same.”

Titles of , Nobiiity-If the applicant bears any, hereditary title or belongs to any older of mobility, he must make an express renunciation at the time of 1 is application

Sołdiers.--Any alien, twenty-one years of age, or over, , who has served on. year, or over, in the Regular or Volunteer Arony of the United States and has bo honorably discharged, may, upon applieation to a court as specified above, proof of one year’s residence, good moral eharacter and honorable discharge, be admitted a citizen of the United States.

Seamera.-Seamen who have deciared their intention to become citizens and who, subsequently to such is claration, have served three years on board a mer. : chant vessel of the United States, may be admitted to citizenship. '

Navy, or Marine Corps-Any, alien...! wenty-one, years of age, or over, who has served five years, or over, in the sonited States Navy or United States Maring

specified above, progf of good moral character, five years’, service and honorabis dis #. be admitted a citizen of the United States. ble dist $o, ife.—A wife may become a citizen by her husband's naturalization, if sha

# might, herself be lawfully naturalized,

Miinors.--Any allen under the age of twenty-one, who has resided in the United States three years next preceding his twenty-first birthday, and has continued to resić , therein up to the time he makes application to be admitted a citizen, may, after he

# arrives at the age of twenty-one, and after, he has resided five years voithin the

t}nited States, including the three years of his minority, be admitted a Citizen ; but no must make a deelaration of Qath and prove to the satisfaction of the court that for the two years next preceding it has been his bona fide intention to become a citizen.

Children, of Naturalized Citizens-The children of persons who ove

# been duly naturalized, being under twenty-one at the time of the naturalization of

their parents, shall, if dwelling in, the United States, be eonsidered as citizens. Citizens’ Children Boro Abigad:-The children of persons who jow are

or have been citizens of the United States are considered as citizens, though ti y # be born out of the limits and loo o,"; United States. ***** § ley nomy w Chinese,_The Naturalization Jaws of the United States have never a : # other than “free white persons” and, persons, of African nativity or ow o

naturalized. The naturalization of Chimanley is also expressly prohibited A. t4, Chapter 126, Laws of 1882, - T} § by Section

any country in Europe. Similar conventions were signed with Great Britain, effective : on April 1, and with Australia, effective on August 1, 1905. The law empowers the #

Postage Rates Between the United States, Cuba and Égland: Possessions.— : Ah, mail matter sent between the United States and Cuba, the Island of Guana, the # Philippine Archipelago, or Tutuila (including all adjacent isłands of the Samoan group j:

Deelaration of Interation.—An alien , seeking naturalization as a citizen # of the United States Fnust declare on oath before a Circuit or District Court of the

of any of the States having common law jurisdietion and a seal and a clerk, at o:

corps and has been honorably discharged, may, upon , application to a court as i:

hal, Taku, Tienstin, Wenchow, Wuchang, Wuhu and Yentai, are transmissible in the # . Enails made up at San Francisco, Sea.ttle and Tacoma for the United States Pastal of , 26, 1899, and went into operation October 1... It was the beginning of a postai service i

ounces in Weight. The postage rate for pareels going from the United States to : Germany is fixed at 12c. for each pound of fraction of a pound. The rate in Ger— o

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State or ruler, and particularly to the one of which he may be at the time a citizen #

Oath on Application for Adrinission.—At the time Gf his application for i

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Protection of Naturalized Citizens.—Section 2,000 of the Revised Statutes of the United States expressly declares that “all naturalized citizens of the || United States, while in foreign countries are entitled to and shall receive from this || Government the same protection of person and property which is accorded to native | born citizens.'" - The Right of Suffrage.—The right to vote, is conferred by the State naturalization by the United States. In several States aliens who have declared their intentions enjoy the right to vote equally with naturalized or native born citizens. But the Federal Naturalization laws apply to the whole Union alike, and no allen may be naturalized until after five years' residence, except an honorably discharged soldier or a person whose parents have been naturalized while he was under twentyone years of age, as above recited. Even after five years' residence and due naturaliza– tion he is not entitled to vote unless the laws of the State confer the privilege upon him. Excluding Anarchists.-The act of . March 3, 1903 (taking effect June 1 1903), imposed these further restrictions on the naturalization of aliens: No person who disbelieves in or who is opposed to all organized government, or Who is a member of or affiliated with any organization entertaining and teaching, such disbelief in or opposition to all organized government, or who advocates or teaches the duty, necessity, or propriety of the unlawful assaulting or killing of any officer or officers, either of specisic individuals or of officers generally, of the government of the United States or of any other organized government, because of , his or their official character, or who has ill violated any of the provisions of this act, shall be naturalized or be made a citizen | of the United States. All courts and tribunals and all judges and officers thereof having jurisdiction of naturalization proceedings or duties to perform in regard thereto shall, on the final application for naturalization, make careful inquiry into such matters," and before issuing the final, order, or certificate of naturalization cause to be §ored of record the affidavit of the applicant and of his witnesses so far as applicable, reciting and reaffirming the truth of every material fact requisite for naturalization. All final orders and certificates of naturalization hereafter made shall show on their face specifically that said affidavits were duly made and recorded, and all orders and Certificates that fail to show such facts shall be null and Void. Any person who purposely procures naturalization in violation of the provisions of this section shall be fined not more than five thousand dollars, or shall be imprisoned not less than one nor more than ten years, or both, and the court in which such con viction is had shall, thereupon adjudge and declare the Qrder or decree and all certificates admitting such o: to citizenship null and void. Jurisdiction is hereby conferred on the courts ha&ing jurisdiction of the trial of such offence to make such adjudication. ---- o - Any person who knowingly aids, advises or, encourages any such person to apply for or to secure naturalization, OF, to file the oreliminary papers declaring an intent to become a citizen of the United States, or who in any naturalization proceeding know— ingly procures or glyes false testimony, as to any material fact, or, who knowingly makes an affidavit false as to any material fact required to be proved in such proceeding, shall be fined not more than five thousand dollars, or imprisoned not less than one to more than ten years, or both.

PENSION LAWS AND STATISTICS.
Persons Entitled to Pensions.

The act of March 18, 1818, thirty—five years, after the termination of the Revolutionary War, was the first general act passed granitng a pension, for service only. Its beneficiaries were required to be in indigent circumstances and in need of assistance. About 1820 Congress became alarmed at the large number of apo Revolutionary plicants for pensions under this act (there were about 8,000) and &R’s on May 1, 1820, passed what has been known as the “alarm, act.' which required as pensioners then on the roll to furnish a schedule of the amount of property then in their possession. Many of the pensioners whose schedules showed they possessed too much property Were dropped from the rolls. Pen| signers were dropped who owned as small an amount as $150 worth of property. On May 15, 1828, or forty-five years after, the War, service pension was granted to those who served to the end of the War of the Revolution. On June 7, 1832, or forty-nine years after the blose of the war, & general law was enacted pensioning survivors Who served not less than six months in said War. On July 4, 1836, being fifty-three years after one termination of the war, an act was passed granting pension, for five years to Ho olutionary War widows, provided they were married to the soldier, or sailor before th close of his last service and that his service was not less than six months. On July 7, 1838, or fifty-five years after the close of the war, the above act Was amended so as to provide where the marriage took place besore January 1, 1794. ... On July 29, 1848, or sixty-fiye years after the war, the above laws were amended to include those who were married prior to January 1, 1300. On February 3, 1853, or seventy years after the war, an act was passed striking out the limitation as to date of marriage. The first law granting pension for service, in the War of 1812 was passed February 14, 1871, fifty-six years after the close of the war. This act required sixty days' sorvice, and widows were not entitled unless they were married War of i., §oldier or sailor prior to the treaty of peace, February 17, 1815. i812. - The act of March 9, 1878, sixty-three years after the close of the - waz, reduced the period of . Scovice to fourteen days, and made no | limitation as to date of marriage in case.9% Yo: s ôi, jujy 27, 1892, fifty years after period included in the act, pension was provided for those who served thirty days in the Black Hawk, Creek, Cherokee and Florida

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