Gambar halaman
PDF

| WEBB, Charles Henry (“John Paul”), jourrinalist and author. 71, New-York City, May 24,

WELDON, Lawrence, Associate Justice United States Court of Claims, 75, Washington, April 10.

| WHITE HEAD, Robert, inventor Whitehead torpedo, London, Nov. 14. : WILKINS, , Beriah, ex-Representative in Congress from Ohio, owner and editor of ‘‘The Washington Post,” 59, Washing— | ton, June 7. ...” # WISTAR, Isaac J., Brigadier General U. S. V., scientist and philanthropist, 78, Claymont, Del., Sept. 18, WOLCOTT, Edward O., ex-Senator from Colorado, 56, Monte Carlo, March f. WOLF, the Rev. Dr. Edmund J., press— dent General Synod of the Lutheran Church in America, editor and theolo- gian, 65, Gettysburg, Penn., Jan. 10. ! WORTH, Jacob, New—York politician, 66, Hot Springs, Ark., Feb. 21. # WYLIE, Andrew. Associate Justice (re— o tired) Supreme Court District of Colum— bia, 89, Washington, D. C. Aug. 2.

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

#ZIEGLER, william, capitalist, promoter

[ocr errors][ocr errors]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[graphic][graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[ocr errors]

agree.

| facts. But LO

[ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

The height of few mountains has been ascertained with surveying instruments. Those which any one actually ascends are usually measured by the barometer, which is not infallible, and which at different times may give dissimilar results. The eleva– tion of other mountains, which no explorer has yet climbed, is estimated by persons | i who scrutinized them from adjacent peaks. Here, again, equally good authorities dis– t Besides, in some instances—Ararat and Sinai, for instance—modern geographers cannot with certainty identify mountains of great historic interest. In a table like the | following, therefore, it is impossible to do more than closely approximate the real ngmans, Green & Co.'s Gazetteer, which has been used in the madn, is probably as safe a standard as can be found; although at the time when the last edition came out (1895) Fitzgerald had not ascended Aconcag not visited Mount St. Elias, and Mount McKinley, now in North Annerica, had not even been discovered:

the Duke of the Abruzzi had elieved to be the loftiest peak

Name. Location, Feet. NaIn 6. Location. Feet. Everest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . India, Nep’l.. 129,000 || Mauna Kea- - - --- - - - - Hawaii ...... 13,953 Dapsang . . . . . . . . . . ..] India, Kash' rs28,700 || Mauna Loa. . . . .-- . . . . Hawaii ...... 18, 7 Godwin-Austen . . . . . . India, Kash’rl28,265 || Jungfrau . . . . . . . . . . . . Switzerland . 13,670 Kanchanjanka . . . . . . . India, Nep’l..]28,176 || Fremont’s Peak. ---. Wyoming ... 13,570 Makulu . . . . . . . . . . --... iii. No. 37:38; otindanao..... Potipoles ... [i.e., Mustagh—ata (Kash- Gross Glockner. . . . . . . Aust’n Tyrol. 12,455 gar) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parnir .......]-.500 Fujimo-yama -------| Japan ..... - 12,425 Lunkho (H in do o C . . . . . . . . . -------| New- ... [12,350 Oosh) . . . . . . . . . . . . Pamir .......]25,600 || Teneriffe . . . . . --- . . . . Canary Is’ds. 190 Aconcagua. . . . . . . . . . . Chill . . . . . . . . 23,080 || Korinchi - - - - - - - - - - -- Sumatra. . . . . ]12,100 Pioneer Peak .......] India. ... . . . . 22,600 || Muley Hacen, Sl. N-l Spain . . . . . . . 11,781 Illimani . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bolivia ... . . . 122,500 || Hood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oregon ... ... 11,225 Hua Scan ... - - - . . . . . . . . Peru ........ [22,000 || Anet hou, Pyrenees-- || Spain . . . . . . . [11,168 Sorata ............. Bolivia. . . . . . . $21,500 || Petermann's Peak... Greenland ... 11,000 Demavend . . . . . . . . . . | Persia --- . . . [21,150 || Etna . . . . . . . . .... -- - --- Sicily . . . . ... 10,865 Sajama. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bolivia . . . . . 21,000 || Dhor-el-Khodib - - - Chimborazo . . . . . . . . Ecuador . . . . [20,4 Lebanon) ... 10.625 McKinley ..........| Alaska ...... 20,464 || Shar Dagh. . . . . . . . . . . Albania. . . . . . ; 9,800 El Mist1 . . . . . . . . . . ... Peru . . . . 0.230 || St. Helen’s... ---------| Alaska . . . . . . . 9,750 Nan Shan range. . . . . China. . . . . . . . . 20,000 || Zugspitze - - - - - - - .-. Bavaria. . . . . . . 9,710 Ruwen-Zorl. . . . . . . . . ; Africa. . . . . . e ,000 || Corno, Apennines. . . . . Italy . . . . . . . . . ,580 Kilima–Njaro ...... East Africa...] 19,720 || Pic du Midi... -------| France ... . . . . . 9,449 Cotopaxi . . . . . . . . . . . Ecuador . . . . 19,613 || Perim Dagh. -- - - - - - - Macedonia .. 8.8% Logan • a s e a s- e < e < * * * * Canada. - - - - 0 19,514 Gerlachfalva. • * * * *-* <> Hungary - & © o 8, 700 Antisana ...........| Ecuador .... }19,335 || Sinai . . . . . . . . . . . . .--| Arabia. . . . . . . 8,535 Cayambe . . . . . . . . . . . Ecuador . . . . 19,186 || Pindus, range- - - - - - - Eur’n Turk’y | 8,450 Huila. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Colombia ... 18,700 || Galdhoppingen . . . . . . Norway . . . . . ,399 Elbruz (Caucasus)... Russia. . . . . . . 18,526 linkiona ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . Greece . . . . . . . 8,240 orizaba ............ Mexico ...... |18,314 || Monte Azul. . . . . . . --- Cuba. . . . . . . . . . 8,070 St. Elias . . . . . . . .....] Alaska. ...... 18,120 || Parnassus , ... . . . . . . . Greece . . . . . . . 8,065 Éopocatapéti . . . . . . . . . Mexico ...... 18,000 || Spelas, Pindus. . . . . . . Greece ------ ,665 Ararat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Armenia. . . . . 16,925 || Adam's . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ceylon - - - - -- 7,429 Charles Louis. . . . . . . . New—Guinea . 16,739 || Townsend ---------- Australia. ... 7,350 Pich in Ca. . . . . . -- ....| Ecuador .... [15,918 || Mitchell . . . . . . . . . . . . . N. Carolina. 711 Mont Blanc......... | Fr’ch Savoy. 15,775 || Washington --------- N. Hampsh. €, 283 Fairweather . . . . . . . . . Alaska . . . . . . . ]15,599 || Adams : . . .: . . . . . . . . . . N. Hampsh’e. [ 5,776 Monte Rosa......... Switzerland . 15.215 || Teplos-iz, Urals. . . . . Russia ... . . . . 6,540 Whitney • * ~ e s—e e o 'o e o 'o' California. • *-e 14,900 C e = e o e e o e < e <-e to e New-York to “e 5,403 Matterhorn . . . . . .... Switzerland . 14,775 || Mansfield ... --- - - - - - Vermont .... 4,430 Tizi Tamjurt, Atlas. Morocco .....]14,609 || Ben Nevis........... Scotland , ---| 4,406 Sierra Blanca. . . . . . . . Colorado ...] 14,464 ||Vesuvius ... ---------| Naples • ?---- 205 Rainier .............] Washington . |14,444 || Slide, Catskills......! New-York . . . 4. O Shasta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . California. ... 14,442 || Yunque ... ----------| Porto Rico. -- §§ Long’s Peak• * *** * * * & © Colorado © & © e 14,271 Snowdon • a e e. e. e. * * * * * Wales e e o co-or-o-e 8,57 Bilze's Peak. . . . . . . . . ] Colorado . . . . . 14,147 FAILURES IN THE UNITED STATES. (Reported by R. G. Dun & Co.) Number. | Liabilities. Manufacturers. | *1905. *1904. of 905. $1904. Iron, foundries and nails. . -------- 60 ) 84 || $1. §§ 7 §§ Machinery and tools. . . . . --- • * * * * * * 205 207 6,348,9 i.324,533 woollens, carpets and knit goods--- 82 42 1,592,919 2.175.616 Cottons, lace and hoslery. . . . . . ---- 16 83 ###$$. §§iši; Lumber, carpenters and Coopers--- 835 830 6,7 643 Żóði 973 Clothing and millinery. - - - - - < *----> --> --> 419 477 *; 360 iotă4 Hats, gloves and furs. . . . . . o e.e. e-o-o-o-o 48 S1 . “. Chemicals, drugs and paints------- 69 51 is&341 1,738,310 Printing and engraving. ----------- 164 192 995 1, 81 Milling and bakers- - - - - - - - - * * * *-o-o-o-o- 216 224 1,607 #; 820 — Ileather, shoes and harness. • * * * * * * Y9 # §63.16i 2,1 Liquors and tobacco. ... • ... .” --- 108 84 1. | 8,591,918 é."oaono, and bricks..." 83

[graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]

IMMIGRATION BY COUNTRIES, 1904 AND 1905. 875 FAILUREs IN THE UNITED STATEs—(Continued.) Number. | Liabilities. . > *# ; Manufacturers. - *1905. “1904. *1905. *1904, Ai; Other • - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - J _941 982 | 15,608, 149 12,280,240 • " Total manufacturing. . . . . . . . . . . 2,780 2,993 $46,582,745 $55,783,137 Traders. General stores . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,621 1,638 } $10,356,903 $11,505,630 Groceries, meats and fish . . . . . . . . . . 2,079 2,222 7,898,328 8, 176,321 Hotels and restaurants. . . . . . . . . . . . . 437 491 2,893, 199 3,380,086 Liquors and tobacco. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,036 981 3,910,971 4,598,877 Clothing and furnishing. . . . . . . . . . . . 677 819 5,355, 129 6, 182,553 Drygoods and carpets. . . . . . . . to go to e o so 495 463 Ö,226,454 8,213,201 Shoes, rubbers and trunks. . . . . . . . . 294 336 - 1,793, C61 2,176,546 Furniture and crockery. . . . . -** * * * * * * 190 22.2 1,155,842 1,752,903 Hardware, stoves and tools. . . . . . . . 310 349 2,668,808 3.289,67s Drugs and paints. . . . . . . . * * * * * * * * * 349 355 1,622,730 2,053,571 Jewelry and clocks.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192 231 1,649,189 , 296 Books and papers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (53 65 410,784 526,383 Hats, furs and gloves. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 54 291,435 659,499 All other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 859 867 6,846,965 12,110,845 G Total trading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8,633 || 9,093 $52,080,400 . . $66,471,388 Brokers and transporters.......... I 326 494 6,671,592 27 ,444,821 Total commercial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11,739 || 12,580 $105,334,737 $149,698,846 Banking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 107 24,048,155 25,374,911

*Report covers twelve months from December 1st to November 30th; all other figures for callendar year.

[merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

Countries. | 1905. 1904. | Incr. T. Decr. Austria e e s & e o 'o -'s s m = e < e < * * * * * * * * * * e a e s a s a do o so to e a so e o os e s a s 111,990 sy ll Hungary ................ ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: ## 177,156 98,537 . . . . . . . . Belgium * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * g e. e. e. e. e. g. e. e. 5,302 3,976 1,326 • * * * * * * * Denmark . . . . . . . . . . . . . * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * g is e o e e 8,970. 8,525 445 e & 4, so e o & Il Trance, including Corsica. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10, 168|| 9,406 T62]. . . . . . . German Empire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...'..................] § 4.3%).......]” to '. Greece * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *, * * * * * ~ * * - 10,515 11,343 * * * * * * * 828 ii Italy, including Sicily and Sardinia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221,479| 193,296 || 28, 183}..... ... Netherlands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * * * * * * * * * * * e s e o e < * * * * * * * * * 4,954 4,916 38 . . . . . . . li NOTWay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * s e a * * * * * * * 25,064 23,808 1,256 . . . . . . . | Portugal, including Cape Verde and Azore. Islands. . . . . . 5,028 6,715 . . . . . . & 1,687 floo Em* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * # * * * * * * * * * * * : * * * * * & o e o 'o e. 16# 7,087 e to is e o e is 2,650 | Russian Empire . . . . . . . . * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * & o o to e o o go to so y à1. Finland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * * * * * * * * * * ..........] §§ 145,141. 39,756 [....... | Servia, Bulgaria and Montenegro. . . . . * * * * * * * * * * to e o so, o so & 2,043 | 1,825 7181. . . . . . . . H Spain, including Canary and Balearic Islands. . . . . . . . . 2,600 3,996) . . . . . . . 1,396 Sweden * * * > * * * * * * * * * * B & a wo e o 'o e * * * * * * * * * * is e o so * * * * * * * * * * * 26,591 27,763 * e s to e o 'o 1,172 i Switzerland * * * * * * * * to 4 & 9 o' • * *-* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 4,269 5,023 $ to $ to 4 to so 754 Turkey in Europe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,542 4,344 1981. . . . . . . # England . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64,709 38,626 26,083 . . . . . . . Ireland . . . . . . . . . . . to s e o e # is a e : * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * g e o 'o e o e 52,945 36,142; 16,803 . . . . . & 4 Scotland to & e o a no e & * * * * * * * * e i s • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 16,977 11,092 Ö,885 • * * * * * * * Wales W. & is to 9 & go e s $ $ * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 2,503 1,730 773 • * * * * * * Europe, not Specified . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 143 . . . . . . . I 30 : Total Europe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ; 974,273}767,933}266,340]... . . . . China. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * a. * * * * * * * * * * * g = to 2,166 4,309 * * * * * * * 2,143 Japan * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * e, o a do no o or e o 'o e < 10,331 14, 264 * * * * g e & 3,933 India. a & # 4 g o & ... • * * * * * > . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 261 to o is a a a to 71 Turkey in Asia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8,157 || 5,235 | 922s. . . . . . . |

[graphic]
[graphic]
[merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

Hostilities between Japan and Russia began without formal notice on February 8, 1904, when a Japanese torpedo Squadron made a night attack on the Russian ships of war lying in the roadstead outside Port Arthur. The immediate cause of the break in friendly relations between the two powers was a dispute Over Russian con– cessions in Corea, and Russia’s general attitude toward the kingdom of Corea. But the real cause lay deeper—in Japan’s determination to force a settlement of the Manchurian question and to establish more definitely her status as a factor in Asiatic politics and Asiatic diplomacy. Japan’s plans for war had been carefully matured, while Russia had, apparently, neglected to arm herself for an early conflict. The first year of the war sound Japan acting, therefore, everywhere on the offensive and Rus– sia forced everywhere to accept the defensive.

In the night attack on the Russian Port Arthur fleet on February 8 three vessels wore Lol pedoed and seriously damaged—the battleships Czarevitch and Retvizan and the cruiser Pallada. All were Subsequently repaired, however, in Naval the inner harbor at Port Arthur. The Russian cruiser Variag and the Operations. gunboat Korietz were trapped in the harbor of Chemulpo by a Japanese squadron under Rear Admiral Uriu. The Variag was challenged to come out and fight, and to avoid being attacked, in neutral waters, where other shipping might be damaged, undertook a duel with the Japanese fleet. After being crippled by the Japanese fire, the Variag returned to Chemulpo and was blown. up by her crew. The Korietz was also blown up. Admiral Togo, who commanded the fišet blockading Port Arthur, made some long range attacks on that fortress early in Tebruary, and near the end of February, and again in March, sent in a number Of fi...hips and transports to seal the channel. But all attempts to bottle the harbor failed. * ~,

In April, after the arrival of Admiral, Makaroff, the Russian fleet made several sorties, but no general engagement 9&curred. 9n April 13, while manoeuvring outside, joiniral Makaroff's flagship, the battleship Petropavlovsk, struck a floating mine and sank almost instantly, with virtually all on board. The Grand Duke Boris, who was ... the battleship, was one of a handful, Qs men Wh9 escaped. Vasili Verestchagin, the Russian painter, Who Was a guest of Admiral Makaroff, went down with the ship.

th later Admiral Togo lost the battleships Hatsuse and Yashima. through enco with fioating mines and the cruiser Yoshina through, a collision. The Russian cruiser Boyarim had struck a mine off Port Arthur a little earlier and had gone to the bottom.

- S fighting occurred off Port Arthur till August 10, when the Russian meetoto o §o the Japanese. Most of the Russian, ships returned to their home port after the fight. But the battleship. Czarevitch, badly injured, put in at Tsing—Chau and was there dismantled. The cruiser Askold reached Shanghai and was dismantled. The cruiser Novik, after touching , at Tsing-Chau, ran ğuş ria divostok. After putting in at. FCorsakovsk, Saghalien Island, she Was ovoi. by two Japanese cruisers, the Chitose and the Tsushima. A battle ensued, and . le Novik, after being disabled, Was abandoned by , her crew, and sunk: The cruiser 15; ana' reported at Saigon, China, and, Was also laid up and dismantled. ... The fleet left in Port Arthur, Was reduced to the battleships Retvizan, Peresviet, Sevastopol, Pobieda and PoltaVa, and the cruisers Bayan and o, th d of the war a Russian squadron of four ships, e armored cruisers R * *...*.*.*.*. and the cruiser Bogatyr, Iay in the harbor of Vladivososs The town was bombarded by , the Japanese in February; but was never block— lo *ie łos. cruisers made two dashes during the spring into Sorean Wao al * ne cruise down the east coast of Japan, sinking and capturing transports and £LI] §t ships On August 14, While On another cruise, the Rurik, Rossia- and §: Were overtaken and attacked off the Corean coast by two squadrons of six

[graphic]
[ocr errors]

THE RUSSO–JAPANESE WAR. 377

! ships operating under Admiral Kamimura. The Rurik was sunk, and the other two

Russians escaped to Vladivostok badly damaged. The Bogatyr, had earlier run on the rocks near VIa divostok, and was laid up in that port for repairs.

After many delays the Russian Admiralty dispatched a squadron from St. Petersburg for the Far East. The first, division, under Admiral Rogestvensky, consisted of the battleships Kniaz Suvaroff, Navarin, Sissoi, Veliky, Borodino, The Baltic Alexander IIs, Orel and Osliabia, the armored cruisers Admiral. Nak. Squadron. himoff, Dimitri Donskoi, Aurora, Almaz, , Jemtchug and Svetland, and a complement of transports, colliers, destroyers and torpedo boats. It left Libau on October 16. Passing through the North Sea on October 21, a part of this division fired on a sleet of Emglish fishing smacks, acting under the belief, according to . Admiral, Rogestvensky’s statements, that Japanese torpedo boats Were attempting to sink the Rus— sians. The British government made a vigorous demand for reparation, and after

[ocr errors][ocr errors]

protracted negotiations, it was agreed to appoint a joint commission to investigate and award damages. Two English fishermen were killed by the Russian fire.

second squadron sailed from Libau on November 16. It consisted of the Cruisers Oleg, Izmurud, Rion and Dnieper, the auxiliary cruisers FCuban, Orel and Terek, and five destroyers.

The two sections of the first division United cff Madagascar in Janua Fln alS Port Arthur had then fallen and the remnants of the *:::::: fleet o"... destroyed, Admiral Itojestvensky spent three months or more in Indian Ocean waters preparing for action. Early in May most of his fleet passed Singapore, and the final trendezvous was had off the ports of French China. Rojestvensky pushed north with

|his entire fleet toward the end of May, and on May 27 met Togo's Japanese fleet in

[ocr errors][merged small]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic][graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
« SebelumnyaLanjutkan »