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to 83.7 per cent. of the total exports, the share of the United Kingdam has fallen's from $6,600,000 to $5,900,000 in 1904: that of Germany has fallen from $5,400,000 to $4,oat of Spain from $1,300,000 to $731,000, and that of France from $1,100,000 to ji

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in imports from this country has been distributed in a fairly equable Inanner, bettefiting thus a large number of American interests represented in the Cubari market, Thus, the imports of cotton, goods show a gain of over 87 per Cent—from $453,100 || in 1903 too $848,500 in 1904—although it should be said that even after such an || increase the relative share of the United States in the total foreign supply of goto ton does not exceed 10.4 per cent., as against 54 per cent. Supplied by the United PCingdom and 18.7 per cent. by Spain. Almost one-half of the manufactures of iron || and steel is row being furnished by the United States, the gain in 1904 of about || half a million dollars being far in excess of gains made by other countries during the same period. - || | ‘‘In boots and shoes the share of the United States has risen from 37 per cent. || in 1903 to 40.3 per cent. in 1904, the value of American shoes imported in 1904 being || $1,202,200, as against $854,300 in 1903. Spanish boots and shoes, , which as late uš.

gtituted 61.3 per cent. of the total shoe imports in 1903 and 58.6 per cent. in 1904, The change of taste and habits illustrated by these figures Is, after all, the product # of slow growth, and no sudden changes in the import figures could be expected. : , z “The Lotal import sigures of machinery, exclusive of machinery for sugar mills ji and distilleries, show a larger relative growth than those credited to the United States, notwithstanding the 20 per cent. differential in favor of the American article. - The progress made by. American machinery sor use in sugar mills and distilleries is || more satisfactory, the import figures for 1904 showing substantial gains over those || for 1903, and the relative share in the total imports for 1904 being 73.2 per cerit., || as against 66.7 per cent. during the pré ceding year.

“‘Considerable gains are shown in the imports of paper and paper manufactures. || Out of $1,304,200 worth of these articles imported in 1903, the share supplied by the # |United States was $319,800, W stile in 1904 the imports from all countries amounted # to $1,387,000, of , which the United States supplied $428,200, or 31.3 per cent. The #: imports of manufactures of wool and textile fibres from this country are still incon— slderable, Cuba, drawing uport Europe for these articles. The in ports of manufactured linen, jute, and other fibres have fallen off, considerably during the last year, while || the imports of wool manufactures show a slight increase.

“The improvement in the economic condition of Cuba is attested by the growth : of imports of foodstuf's from $21,800,000 in 1903 to about $25,000,000 in 1904. Prac— tically all the flour, corn, and lard had been corning from the United States even || prior to reciprocity, and naturally continues to do so now under reciprocity. Of these three articles of popular diet, tho invports of flour have increased from $2,085, – i.

in 1903 to $2,617,800 in 1904. w “The 20 per cent. differential in favor of Anherican grown coffee has benefited || the Porto Pican product, the imports of which into Cuba have increased from is 207,400 to $711,400, constituting 38.4 per cent. t of the 1904 coffee imports, as against 8.6 per cent. Only of the irthports for the preceding year.”

The population of Cuba by Provinces in 1899 was:

Province. - 4 i Number. i ; Province. | Number.

Havana. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 424,804 |; Ciara. * * * * * * * * * * * s o. is 5 & 3 a . . 356,536 a

Matanzas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202,444 Santiago de Cuba. ". . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 : Pinar (lel Pio • * * * * * * * * * * * * 173,064 327,715 ; Puerto Principë . . . . . . . . . . . . 88,234 Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . f 1,572,797 ||

Government receipts and expenditures in the period from July, 1898, to June 1903, have been : - **. *

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May 20. 1902–June 30, 1903. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i8,007, 302.00 15,933,646.00

MExico.

THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT. d . Capital, Mexico City, . President. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Porfirio D! || Vice-President. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Rao coil

The territory_of the United Mexican States (Estados Unidos Méjicanos) is divided into 27 States, 2 Territories and 1 Federal District, whose organization follows that of

“An analysis of the Import sigures by articles discloses the fact that the gain i

1900 supplied almost 80 per cent. of the total demand for the foreign article, con- ||

900 to $2,979,000; corn from $606,600 to $898,000, while lard decreased from $2,885,000 ||

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- - &
MEXICAN POPULATION AND COMMERGE,

the American Union. The States, Territories and Federal . . .' areas and populations, are as follows: eral District, with their capitals,

224

| Area in

English Po tion. States, Capitals, | SQllare pulation * * miles. 1895. 1900. Aguascalientes . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aguascalientes .......... , 2,951 104,615 * Qampeche . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Campeche . . . . . . . . . . . . ... 18,095 88,30 84,281 oliápas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tuxla Gutiérrez. . . . . . . . . . ,230 319,5 363,607 Chihuahua. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chihuahua . . . . . . . . . ..... 87,820 262,771 327,004 'Qoahuila. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . [Saltillo . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... 62,876 241,020 280,899 Colima. . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Colima. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,273 55,752 65,026 Durango . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Durango . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38,02 286,906 371,274 Guanajuato . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guanajuato . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11,874 1,062,554 || 1,065,317 Guerrero . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ] Chilpancingo . . . . . . . . . . . . ; 25,003 4.17,621 474,594 Hidalgo * * * * * * * * * * * * * *-* * * * * * Pachuca. * * * * * * * * g o os so do so, o o 'o. 8,920 558,769 603,074 Jalisco to e & 4 go & e o e o is e o 'o w e o e < * * Guadalajara to a s = e s to s or e o-o-e 31,855 1,107,227 1,137,311 México * * * * * * g e- e. e. g o e o e o f * * * * Toluca * * * * * * * * * * g e is o.o. oo e 9,250 841,618 24,45 Michoacán to g o so go . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Morelia * * * * * * * * * * * * *-o-o: o os 22,881 894,753 935,849 Morelos & * * * * * e g o o &e o is o $ 4 o’ e & Cuernavalca. * * * * * * * *e is is e o e-g 2,774 | 159,355 161,697 Nuevo León. • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Monterey • * * * * * * * * * * * * * *-g 24, 324 | 09.252 326,940 Oaxaca. • * * * * * ** * * * * *-* * * * * * * * Oaxaca. * * * * * * * * ~ s.a.p. e-oe & so o 36,392 884,909 947,910 Puebla . . . . . . . . . -----------. Fuebla . . . . . . . . . . . . . ------ 12,207 984,413 ; 1,024,446 Querétaro * * * * * * g o do e o go o so e o & o Querétaro * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 3,558 228,551 228,489 San Luis Potosí. . . . . . . . . . . . . . San Luis Potosi. . . . . . . . . . ; 25,323 568,449 582, 486 Sinal Oa. e is e o so e o so e < * * * * * * . . ) Culiacán * * * * * * * * * *-os to o os e o 4. 33,681 258,865 296,109 Sonora. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hermosillo . . . . . . . . . -or e o 'o go o 76,922 191,281 220, 553 Tabasco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -- . . . . ] San Juan Bautista. . . . . . . . J.0,075 134,839 158, 107 Tamaulipas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ciudad Victoria.. ----...-- 32,585 206,502 218,948 Tlaxcala . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tiaxcala . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,595 166,803 172,217 Vera Cruz * g g g is e g o & e o so t e o 'o e or * Jalapa. go to & o -& 4 * * * * * * * or a * * * * 29,210 866,355 960,570 Yucatán a 9 s a e < * * * * * * * * * * * * Mérida. 6 * * g g to * * * * * * * * * * * * * 35,214 298,850 312,264 to Côte CaS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Zacatecas • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 24,764 452,578 462,886 Territories. | Topic • * * * * * * * * * a s v-e e o 'o “ - *-* Tepic s & o & & e & & © o or o e * * * * * * * 11,2 148,776 149,677 Baja Californi R La Pas-. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ J% *** * * * *** - - - - - ) Ensemada de Todos Santos 58,345 42,245 47,082 Federal District. . . .----- . . . . . City of Mexico. . . . . . . . . . . 463 476,613 540,478 Islands s a g g o e s - e s is ow-w w or * * * * e do so go or on to go is so e o s o or * * * * * * * * * * * 1,471 | -am-o: Totals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . --- . . . . . . . . . . * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * . . . 76,226 | 12,619,949 liso

Cities and towns of Mexico with a population of over 20,000 were according to the census of 1895:

| | Popu- | | Popu

City or Town. | State. lation. City or Town. | State, | lation. México. . . . . . . . . |Federal District. 329,774|| Morelia. . . . . . . . Michoacán .... of 33,890 Puebla. . . . . . . . . . Puebla. . . . . . . . . . . . 88,684||Oaxaca. . . . . . . . . [Oaxaca. . . . . . -- . . 32,437. Guadalajara. . . . Jalisco . . . . . . . . . * 83,934|| Orizaba. . . . . . . ... [Veracruz . . . . . . . 31,512 San Luis Potosí | San Luis o: 69,050 || Aguascalientes. Aguascalientes . 30,872 JLeon. . . . . . . . ... Guanajuato . . . ~~ 8,426|| Saltillo. . . . . . . . . Coahuila. ... . . . . . . 26,801 Monterey. . . . . . . . Nuevo León. . . . . 45,695 || Durango. . . . . . . . Durango . . . . . . . . 26,425 Pachuca. . . . . . . Hidalgo ... . . . . ..., | 40,487 || VGracruz. . . . . . [Veracruz ... . . . . . . 24,085 Zacatecas. . . . . . . Zacatecas . . . . . ... 39,912|| Toluca. . . . . . . . . [México . . . . . . . . . . . 23, 150 Guanajuato. . . . ] Guanajuato . . . . . 39,403 || Acanceh. . . . . . . . Yucatan . . . . . . . . 22,916 Mérida. . . . . . . . . . Yu Catán . . . . . . . . 36,933}| Celaya . . . . . . . . . [Guanajuato . . . . . . 21,245 Querétaro. . . . . . |####, . . . . . . . 34,576" Zopotlanejo. ... [Jalisco . . . . . . . . . . . 20,270

Trade between the United States and Mexico is Constantly increasing. The cxports to and imports from the United States for the years 1879 to 1905 Were as foll OWS :

| Exports to Imports from | Exports to Imports from

Year, the U. S. __the U. S. Year. the U. S., the U. S. j970 T. . . . . . . . . . $2,715,685 $5,859,709 is 1888 . . . . . . . . . . $17,329,859 $9,897,732 1871 . . . . . . . . . . 3,209,688 7,612, 113||1889 . . . . . . . .-- 21,253,601 11,486,899 1872 . . . . . . . . . . 4,002,920 ! B,543,589||1890 . . . . . . . . . . 22,690,915 13,383,287 1873 * * * * * * * * * 4,276,105 6,264,901 ||1891 . . . . . . . . . . ] 27,295,992 14,333,629 1874 . . . . . . . . . . 4,346,364 5,946,839||1892 . . . . . . . . . . 28, 107,525 14, 293,999 1875 * * * * * * * , 174,594 5,737,282||1893 . . . . . . . . . . . 35,555,099 19,568,634 1876 * * * * * * * * * * 5,100,572 6,200,572 1894 go to o os o on to * * - 28,727.0% | 12,842,149 1877 . . . . . . . . . . 5,204,264 $5,893,494!!1895 . . . . . . . . .. 15,635,788 #99.99% 1878 . . . . . . . . . . 5,231,502 ,460,7 1896 ..........] 17,456,177 19,450,257 1879 . . . . . . . . . . 5,493,221 6,752,245||1897 . . . . . . . . . . 18,513,572 23,421,964 1880 . . . . . . . . . . 7,289,593 7,866,493 ||1898 . . . . . . . . . . . . 19,994,863 21,206,939 1881 . . . . . . . . . . 8,317,802 | 11,171,238||1899 . . . . . . . . . . 22,995,722 : ,483,075 1882 . . . . . . . . -- 8,461,899 | 15,482,582||1900 . . . . . . . . -- 28,646,933 §4, 974,961 łoś. . . . . . . . . . . . 8,177,123 i 16,587,620(1991, ... ----- . . . . 23.8%,3: §475,350 1881 . . . . . . . --- 9,016,486 | 12,704,292 ||1902 . . . . . . . . . . 40,382,596 30,873,606

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THE REPUBLIC OF PANAMA. 225

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afte:"...” and Silver bearing ores are not included in the exports from Mexico | According to statistics prepared by the Mexican Treasury Department the value of all imports into Mexico in 1904–'05 was $85,861,081 in gold, against a value of $78,360,771 in gold in 1903–04. The exports for 1904–05 wereo: in silver at #:

716, against a value in silver of $196,726,510 in 1903–’ Imports in 190 and 1904–05 from the chief European countries were:

Country. 1904–05. 1903–04. Słermany -------- . . . . . . . . . . . . -- . . . . . . ...............— . . . . . . $9,819,538 64; $9,549,665 09 Belgium * * * * • -- - - - - - - - - - - . . . . . . . . . . . • - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- 1,433,759 92. 2,180,405 87 Spain o to * * g : - • p * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *-* * * * * * * * * * * * * or e. e. e. e o 'o e as a e = 3, 734,484 62 3,271,494 82 France . . . . . * : * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * • * * * * *-* -os-e ‘e’ e <-e-s e or e-e, -e e—e e e s 8,482,685 ()3 7,473,474 80 Great Britain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * . . . . . . 10,418,343 11 10,026,146 48

The condition of the public revenues is shown by the following table for the years - 1895-96 to 1903–04, giving the ordinary revenue and expenditures and the percentages

which the annual surpluses represent in proportion to the ordinary disbursements Of the several years: *:

| Ordinary Ordinary EXcess Per— Fiscal years, | Y’eWeInlie expenditure Of Cent*— ! in Cash. in Cash. | revenue. ages, 1895–’96. ----------------------. |$... . . $50,521,470 42|$45,070,123 13 $5,451,347 29| 12.11 1896–97. . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51,500,628 75 48,330,505 25 | 3, 170,123 50 6.25 1897–'98.................... -- . . . . . . . . . . 52,697,984 55 || 51,815,285 66 882,698 89 | 1,70 4 6:639, 670 90

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On March 25, 1905, in accordance with the terms of the law of December 9, 1904, President Diaz established the gold standard, making the peso of 75 centigrams pure gold the unit of the monetary system, and closing the mints to the free coinage of silver. On July 1, 1905, President Diaz announced by proclamation, under the terms of the law of May 24, 1905, the abolition of the Zona Libre, or Free Zone,. On the United States border. This zone, at the time of its abolition, extended from the Gulf of Mexico to Lower California, Eleven per cent of the full duty was then charged on all imports into this territory. g 4. * The regular army of Mexico on its present footing consists of eight major generals, fifty-three brigadier generals, 944 commissioned officers, 2,481 mon—commissioned of— ficers and 27,247 privates. In the navy are six steel gunboats or training ships. Two more gunboats are being constructed. o Xi amendment to the Federal Constitution was adopted in 1904, creating the office of Vice-President, and lengthening the terrm of the President (with that of the Vice-President) to Six years, Mexico now has a railway mileage of over 11,000 miles.

- PANAMA.

Capital, City of Panarna.

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President . . . . . . . ----- - - - - - - - - - - - - * * * * e : * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * - so a o e o e = * * * Manuel Amador

Minister of Government and Foreign Relations. -----------------Santiago de la Guardia

| Minister of Finance . . . . . . . + e o 'o a to 4 & 5 + 0 ° 4 ... . . . . . -- • - - - - - - - - - - . . . Francisco Espriella Minister of Justice and Public Instruction . . . . . . ---. • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Julio Fàbrega |} Minister of Public Works. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Manuel Quintero

On November 3, 1903, a revolution broke out in the City of Panama, which soon spread to other parts of the State of Panama, and resulted in the complete obliteration of Colombian sovereignty. Independence was proclaimed by a provisional junta composed of José Augustin Arjano. Federico, Boyd and Tomas, Arias. The Governor of fanama, and the general eommanding, the Colombian military, forces were arrested and deported, and within forty-eight hours the last vestige of Colombian authority on the Isthmus had vanished. Not a life was lost accomplishing the revolution.

The junta quickly sought recognition as a de facto and then as a de jure govern— ment. The United States recognized its de facto responsibility, and prepared to keep the line of Isthmian transit free from interruption in case Colombia, should attempt to reimpose her sovereignty. Orders Were given to allow no Colombian troops to be landed at points from which they Would menace Isthmian - transit. Colombia not making, and having no power to make, a serious effort to reconquer the Isthmus, the new republic soon asked and obtained complete political recognition. Philippe Bunau|Varilla was commissioned envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary to the United States. He reached Washington from New-York on November 7, and was. formally received on November 13 by President Roosevelt. On November 17 the new

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government was recognized by France, and shortly afterward by G. - | Germany and Russia. y Great Britain, Qne of the first, acts of the new Panama Government was to propose the eon- . clusion of an Isthmian Canal treaty with the United States. A special commission consisting of . Federico Boyd. a member of the Provisional Junta, and ir. Manuel Amador, , Minister of Finance, was sent to Washington to conduct the negotiations. A canal treaty was drawn and signed in Washington on November 18. It was ratified by the Panama. Government on December 2, 1903, and was gubmitted for ratification to the United States, Senate by President Roosevelt on December 7. This convention, the full text of which can be found under “Treaties Rat1sled, 2d, session LVIIIth Con. gress,’’ page 87, was approved by the Senate on February 23, 1904. * t On December 13 the Provisional Junta published a decree convoking a national convention for January 15, 1904. . . This convention, elected on December 28, 1903, met in oma. framed a constitution and elected Manuel Amador President of the reptublic, Dy a decree of the convention, which resolved itself into a legislative assembly, it was declared on March 4 that from December 31, 1904, the monetary unit of Panamá should be the gold dollar. ... The Republic of Panama has an area of 31,571 square miles and a population of | 300,000. The principal ports are Panama, on the Pacific Coast, and Colon on the Atlantic side, and these ports are visited annually by more than one thousand vessels, which land over one million tons of merchandise and nearly 100,000 passengers, chiefly for transfer over the Panama Railway. forty-seven miles in length, connecting the Pacific port of Panama with the Atlantic port of Colon, ; Colon, or Aspinwall, as it is sometimes called, has a population of about 3,000 persons. The city of Panarna has a population of about 25,000. It was founded in 1519, burned in 1671, and rebuilt in 1673, while Colon is of much more recent date, having been founded in 1855. -

The republic is divided into seven provinces, as foilo WS:

Provinces, .* * Capitals. ProvinceS. Capitals. Panama. * * * g e s e o is g o e Pana.rna. Los Santos e to g × < * * * * * * Los Santos. Color, • * * * * * * * * * * g o 6 & © Colon. "Veragua, * * * * * * * * * * * * * Santiago.

Bocas dei Toro. . . . . . . Bocas del Toro. Cocle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Penoriorne,
Chiriqul . . . . . . . . . . . . . . David.

The population of the republic is composed of various elements—Spanish, Indian, negro, and a limited number of persons from the European countries and the United . States, especially those engaged in corn Inerce and transportation and the operation || of the Panama Railway. Another element is that of persons brought to the Isth- # mus as laborers for the construction of the canal, and their descendants. Since the #. abolition of slavery in Jamaica many blacks and mollattoes have settled on the Isthmus as small dealers and farmers. ;

Of the commerce of Panama, which reaches a value qf $3,000,000 annually, the United States supplies a targer share than any other country. The inn. . . - portations at the port of Colon ... for the , fiscal year ended Commerce. june 30, 1903, as shown by the report , of the United ... " States consul, amounted to $952,684, of which $614, 179 was from the United States, $119,086 from France, $118,322 from England, $76.386 from Germany. The figures of the fiscal year 1903 show a considerable increase from, those of 1902, in which the value of the imports at Colon were $776,346. Of the $614, 179 inports || from the Únited States at Color, in 1903 $200,744 was dry goods, $189,333, provisions. $53,300 coal. $38,642 lumber, $32,900 kerosene, $30,400 liquors, and $31,940 hardware, The value of the importations from the United States in 1903 exceeded those of 1902 by about $160,000, . The exports to the United States from Colon in 1903 amounted .] to $173.370, of which $75,432 was bananas, $54,960 cocoanuts, $12,472 turtle shells, $9,400 ivory nuts, $6,460 hides, and $5,924 coffee. $ from the port of Panama, the 'exports to the United States in the fiscal year, 1903 amounted to '$193 342, of which $6,767 was hides, $49,974 India robber, $27,805 Soso nuts, $16,598 ivory nuts, $13,872 deerskins, and $6,908 coffee. . The consul at Panama states that the imported articles come mostly from England, Germany, H. France, Ialy and the United States, but gives no statistics of the imports. The im- || ports from Panama into the United State; in the year ended June 30, 1904, were valued at $440.744, and the exports from the United States to Panama were valued at $979,724. t Panama is connected with San Francised by a weekly steamer schedule operated # py the Pacific Mail Steamship. Company and with Valparaíso by a weekly stearner || schedule operated by the Pacific Steam Navigation Company and South American || steamship Company. Two passenger arid two freight trains leave Panama daily for £olon and olo on...". The time for passenger trains over the forty- H %. miles of railway is three hours, sever. Panama there is one cable line north to American, ports and Qiie, to the 'south. The actual time, consumed in communicating with the United States and receiving an answer, is 8tated by the consul to be usually about four/hours. There are also cable fines from Colon, to the United States and Europe. so - Import duties average, about 10 per cent gold. On ticiuors and beverages | there are special taxes; these vary according to the Irinds and Ktualities of the imports. Cigars, tobacco, cigarettes, salt and ice are government mo: # inopolièg or are let out by the government, to rivate parties; The governments of the hotoi states and of Panama concluded in 1905 a treaty of extradition and a treaty || to ...i, o, ... ;-- ~~~~~ 1 Pari" it is R at sootn estic vates, .” >

Note—see other matter about Panama and the canal zone under “The Isthmian si Canal Zone.’’

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AREA, POPULATION, IMPORTS, EXPORTS, ETC., OF THE PRINCIPAL COUNTRIES OF THE WORLD. |
Area and Population. | Foreign Conannerce. '. | *— colone
Cù)? TNTTRIES, i r | - * * 2 . " Exports from | Imports, into
A rea, , Population. | , Year. Jumports. FExports. Lsnited States | United States
Square miles. --- - * * | to. frontl. #
Argentina. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ith. . . . § | 4. #% | ; § §, $9,808,529 $10,396,873 &
Australasia. : Common Wealth . . . . . 2,972,573 3,772, G 1902. | 203,644, - ,713,00 F- 3 -
New Zealand. . . . . . 104,751 738,999 || 1993 °55,121,000 366,403,000 S 2S, 101,784 13,845,001|}~
Austrial—Hullgary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241,333 45.405,000 || 1902 t 349,228,000 388,460,000 6,672,580 10,093,34 §
Austria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ** 115,903 2 *26, 151,000 | ----- -----------> - – -e of
IHungary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . *1:3,332 **133.4% is . . . . . . *s--- se- —18
Belgium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i. e. j 1,373 ,694,000 || 1903 459,472,000 371, 620,000 43,515, 112 17.912,0343
Bolivia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703,604 1,816,000 || 1902 #; 11,076,000 ,926 1,731
Brazil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * * * * 3:19.9% ##o #3 113,288,000 177.323,000 11,155,565 71,583,086 ;
British Colonies, n, e. s. . . . . . . . . 951, 333 14,434,000 | 1902 475,370,000 280,744,000 B7,886,757 22,875,024 -3
Bulgaria. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38,080 3,744,000 1902 13,751, 20.011,000 *-* Y-4
Canada. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,04S. 710 5,457,000 || $1903 – 224,814,000 133,161,000 123,472,416 54.5%.42%
Central America: Costa. Pica. . . . . 23,000 318,000 || 1902 ##$! 5,661,000 1,697,048 3,291,345|.
Guate mala, 43,774 1,647.000 || 1900 3,018,000 7. 134,000 1.128,418 2, 190,145
Honduras 46,25s) 775,000 || 1902 1,672,000 2,357,000 969,963 1,136,220 :
Nicaragua. . . . . 49,200 *399,999 || 1991 2,185,000 3.243,000 1,364,518 2, 199,313
San Salvador.. 7,225' 1,007,000 || 1902 2,624,000 ###$ 868,82 oš3,459||=
Chłl? . . . . . . . . . * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 279,901 3,051,000 || 1902 48,336,000 $37,846,000 3,753,222 7,155.839|E
China. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ~~ 1,532,426 407,253,000 1902 198,364,000 134,720,000 22,698,282 23,183, iişjë.
Colombia. . . . . . * * * * * * * e - s a to 6 - * * * * 504, 773 194,000, S98 10,695,000 18,487,000 2,923,404 8, 140,043
libà. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . so a 3 & e e 43,000 ,573,000 || $ 1903 58,826,000 77,849,000 21,769,572 62,341.942}92
Denmark . . . . . . . * a s & a do o e a * * * * * • 15,360 2,465,000 || 1993 . t; $5,730, 14,812,900 3.43.4%
Ecliador . . . . . . . . . . . • * * * * * * * * * * * 116,000 1,204,000 || 1902 7,029,000 3,811,000 1,847,850 1,823, 166] Ho
Egypt. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 383,900 9,734,000 || 1902 73,229,000 37,081,000 667,577 16,854,635:
Finland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . a g + æ 4 o $ to a 144,255 2,744,000 1902 45,191,000 39,117,000 (4) (4) * ,
France . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207,054 38,962,000 1902 848,926,000 829,671, 70,497,327 7,895,253%
Algeria. . . . . . . . . * * * * * * * * * * * * 184,474 4,739,000 1902 64,228,000 60,804,0s # §
Tuhls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - - 51, 1,900, 1901 12,483,000 7,551,000 886,758 *461,102 so
French Colonies, n. 9. S. . . . 3,375,602 26,427,000 1901–02 46,808,000 35,806,000 2,785,418 1,088,493 o'
French East Indies”. . . . . . . . 461,196 ,346, 902 41,964,000 40,677,000 62,361 3,873 to
German Empire. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . e 208,830 58,549,000 1902 1,340,178,000 1,113,313,000 174,264,495 111,999,904
German Colonies. . . . . . . . . . . . 1,025,829 3,543,0 1901 8,969,000 ,497, 30,949 11,702 3
GreeC& . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25,014 2,434,000 1902 26,034,000 15,466,000 369,919 1,239,144|3:
Haiti . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10,204 1,294,000 1901 5,500,000 2,760,000 1,956,343 1,137,341|z
India, British” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * * * 1,766,642 294,361,000 1902–03 353,614,000 408,396,990 4,866,683 51,831,665 H}
Italy . . . . . . . . . . . w a e o 'o e o & * * * * * * * 10,646 32,475,000 1902 342,718,000 284, 177,000 33, 135,512 33,612,864:
Japan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . --- - - - 147,655 5,862,000 1902 135,822,000 7,326,000 21, 62 '...so
Formosa. . . . . . . . . . . . . . * * * * * * 13,45S ,706,000 1902 5,030,000 6,881,000 S 21,622,603 40,597,582 §
Korea. . . . . . . . . . . . - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 4,400 1912,000,000 1903 _3,744.9% 4, 142,000 257,130 ---, X
Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * * * * * * 767,060 13,545,000 || 8 1903. 14,639,900 $3,299,999 42,227,786 261,802,902
Netherlands . . . . . . . . . t - - - - - - - - - - 12,563 5,347,000 1902 867,308,000 732,915.000 74,576, 1 20,899,588
| Tyutch East Indies. . . . . . . . . . | 736,400 35,736,000 1901 86,894, 98,724,000 p.210,963 15,343,948}, i
| Norway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * * * * * * * 124, 130 2,263,000 || 1902 77,779,000 45,687,000 3) 8 iš
| Paraguay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - is o o so to 97,722 636, | 1902 2,270,000 ... 3,787,000 14,815 3.890; |
|P rsia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • - - - - - - - ? 628,000 | 129,500,000 1902 28,703,000 18,243,000 || -ex-r- wo

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