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Tonsion Laws AND payments. 103

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wars with Seminoje Indians from 1832 to 1842 and to their widows. On June 27, 1902, | { the Benefits of said act were extcroled from that date to the Sûr- || Hndiari, vivors of the Florida and Georgia. Seminole Indian war of 1837 || | Wars. and 1818; the Fevre River Indian war of Illinois of 1827; the Sao and l'Ox Indian War of 1831; the Sabine Indian disturbances # | 1830 and 1337 : the Caymse Indian war of 1847–48 on the Pacific coast; the Flori.33. Wars with the Seminole indians from 1842 to 1858; the Texas and New Mexico India]] } war of 1849 to 1856; the California. }ndian disturbances of 1851 and 1852; the Utah || ln dian disturbances of 1850 to 1853, and the Oregon and the Washington Territor'3' || Indian wars fronn J.851 to 1856, a 11d to Lhe surviving widows, - W On January 29, 1887, thirty-nine years aster the close of the war, an act was War. With passed providing for soldiers and sailors and their widows for Mexico service of sixty days, is 62 years of age, or disabled or do* A.to. F *-* * F s pendent. There has never boen &ny Jaw pensioning widows of soldiers whose death was due to § crvice in tinfte of peace prior to March 4, 1861. No provision has ever been made for mothers and fathers and hr'Others and sisters js the death of soldier or sailor resulted from service prior to March 4, 1861. The laws relating to pension have been In ore jheral since 1801 than they were prior to that date. To make it plainer, as an illustration of this sact, a sailor who lost both arms in the service and line of duty . prior to March 4, 1861, would be entitled to a rating beginning at $3.50 per month and , to the various rates provided from time to time to February 12, 1889, when he si would receive $100 poor month. - i - Any Officer, soldier, sailor" Ji marine, disabled by reason of woup d received or disease contracted in the tervice of the United States, and in the line of duty, may be persioned for such disability during its continuance. In caso

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Acts of July 14, of his death from causes originating as above set forth, his is | 862, and widow or his child or ghildren under 16 years of age become en- ||

March 3, 1873. tit}ed to sension. If, he left no widow, or child under 16, his - dependent mother, father, Jr orphan sisters and brothers are ch– titled, in the Order named. Any officer, Sold!er, sailor or marine who served ninety days or roore in the Imjii— tary or naval Service of the United States during the late war of the rebellion, who has been honorably discharged therefron), and who is suffering from disability of a ii. permanent character, not the result of his own vicious habits,

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|| Act of June 27, which , incapacitates him sron) the performance of manual labor || | 1898, Iks Amended in such a degree as to render him unable to earn a support, is by the Act of entitled to pension under this act of not less than $6 per month May 9, 1960. nor Inore than $12 per month. In case of the death of any person

- named above his widow seconnes entitled to pension, provided she married him prior to June 27, 1839, and that she i8 without other means of support, than her daily labor. If she remarries or iiés the child or children of such soldier + or sailor under the age of 16 years become entitled. The aet of May 9, 1900, which is an amendment of the act of June 27, 1890, provides that in determining inability to earn a support, each and every infirmity shall be duly considered, and the aggre. gate of the disabilities shown be rated. It is also provided that a widow may have | title to pension if she is left without means of support other than her daily labor j and an actual net income not exceeding $250 per year.

- All wonen employed by the Surgeon—General of the army as aurses during the . . . Act. O late war of the rebel}}on, for a period of six months or more, and | . # August 5, 1892. who were honorably relieved from such servies, are granted .

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pension, provided they are unable to earn a support. There is no law granting Service pension to any person for sorvice rendered since 1858, aside, from the afkowańces made under the provisions of #. :*. * *. 4757, o Statutes, for twenty years' and 13. It’ess SEOIAS. -- en years’ service, respectively, in the United State T+x v = & - Mariyme Corps. -- - d States Navy or To obtain a pension the applicant must file a claim with the Commissioner of pensions. Washington, P. C. In a claim, by the soldier be should set forth aii his military or naval Service, giving, dates of epiistinent and discharge. The prime requirement to establish, a claim under act of July 14, 1862, usually toroi the Methods of general law. , is to show that the disability for which pension is Application. §almed had its origin, while in the service and line of duty; that iè has existed as a disabling cause from date of discharge, and now oxists, in a degree pensionable under the law. In a claim under the act of J. |: 1890, the essential. requirements are: , A, service of ninety days or more, an A. orable discharge thorefrom and proof that the disability for which perhsion is claimed j is not due to claimant’s own vicious habits, but it need not Hecessarily be of service. origin: , In, a widow's claim it is necessary to Rhow her legal marriage to the soldier || the date of his death, and, under the general law, that it was due to some c. ...} service origin. So must, also show that she has remained his widow. If to a...] children of the soldier, undor, sixteen years of age at the date of his death, their nanosis should be givea and the date of birth of each clearly shown. If a sly have died the # date should be proved. In a widow's claiun under the act of June 27, Too) the re— quirements as to service is, the same as under an invalid claim, and in addition .thereto she must show, a , legal oarriage to the soldier prior to the passage of th: ... the fact of soldier's leath (but it, Reed, not, be shown to be due to service, i. ..." tinued widowhood and that she is without other means of support that:'k. daily }a}) Or, * - The aët of May 9, 1900, amending the act of June 27, 1890, gives who are without meants of 8*Toport; other than their daily labor § 3. too *:* N

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R(04 PENSION LAWS AND PAYMENTS,

| come of $250. A minor child's title to pension accrues only on the death or remarriage # of the widow, which sact must be shown, in addition to the requirements in widow's | claim, A dependent mother must show her relationship to the soldier, his celibacy, o that he contributed to her support, that his death was due to some cause of services | origin, the date of his death, and, under the general law, that she was dependent | upon him at the date of his death, Under the act of June 27, 1890, it is only neces— | sary to show dependence at date of filing claim and since then. A dependent father || must show relationship by legal marriage to soldier's mother, the date of soldier's | birth, and of the mother's death, in addition to the requirements in the mother's claims. i Applications rejected by a Board of Pension, Surgeons may be reconsidered on the # evidence of two physicians that disability, exists. Pensions for priyates range from ii ś6 to $30 a month in most cases, though $72 is granted to those who have lost botti feet or both eyes, and $100 a month to those who have lost both hands. \

The following executive order, issued March 15, 1904, further defined certain gent

eral conditions under which a claimant's disability may be presumed: * * “‘Ordered : (i) In the adjudication of pension claims under said act of June 2 | 1890, as amended, it shall be taken and eonsidered as an evidential fact, , if the con- trary does not appear, and if all other legal requirements are propis, ofler erly met, that, when a claimant has passed the age of 62 years t 10 w

he is disabled one-half in ability to perform raanual labor and is entitled to be rated at six dollars per month; after 65 years at # eight dollars per month; after 68 years, at ten dollars per month, and after 70 years' at twelve dollars per month. “(2) Allowances at higher rate, not exceeding twelve dollars per month, will con– tinue to be made as heretofore, where disabilities other than age show a condition of inability to perform manual labor. - w *(3) This order shall take effect April-13, 1904, and shall not be deemed retroactive. The former rules of the office fixing the minimum and maximum at 65 and 75 years, respectively, are hereby modified as above, ’’ The number of persioners on the rolls on June 30, 1905, and the total during the fiscal year ended on that date were as follows :

amount paid

States. | States | and Territories, No. Arnount. and Territories. No. | A mount, Alabamca. . . . . . . . . . ; 3,982 $543,436 63||North Carolina. . . . . . . 4.238 589,804 20 Alaska. . . . . . . . . . . | 91) 11,080 S5} | North Dakota. . . . . . . . , 1,972; 287,538 61 Arizona. . . . . . . . . . . S17 114,193 79 || Ohio . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . 100,335] 15, 102,612 33 Arkansas . . . . . . . . . 11,525 1,588,566 32! |Oklahoma. . . . . . . . . . . 9, 19 1,294,206 79 California. . . . . . . . . . 24,406 3,333,401 28 || Oregon . . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 5.SS 989, t)71 58 öjä. . . . . . . . . . . . $484 i.184,402 S1 || Pennsylvania. . . . . . . 100,920 13,478, 148 24 | Connecticust . . . . 12,963 1,620,059 94 || Rhode Island , 5,509 661,786 35 || Delaware . . . . . . . . . . 2,676 §§2,547 79||South &arolina. . . . . . .i.26 273.380 66 || District Columbia. | 8,728. 1,435,694 46 |South Dakota. | 3.67. 670,336 22 Florida. . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,108 537,167 23 || Tennessee . . . . . . . . . . 19,581 2,765,070 27 ... Georgia. . . . . . . . . . . 3,698 508,485 85 Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . | 9,069; 1,203, 180 $9 Sofíawaii ........... 52 6,077 39|| Utah . . . . . . . . . . . * * * 973 129,343 59 sel Idaho . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2, 109 292,450 33 || Vermont . . . . . . . . . . . ; S, 564 1,392,060 93 filinois . . . . . . . . . . . ] 70,145|| 9,840,949 49 || Virginia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8,813 1,261,741 (37 Indiana. . . . . . . . . . . 62. 133 10,104,908 43 || Washington . . . . . . . . 9,765) 1,278,660 15 Indian Territory... 3,929 555,877 96 || West Virginia. . . . . . . 12,216 1,736,033 31 Iowa. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35,980 5,480,045 82 || Wisconsin . . . . . . . . . . 26,981 | 3,861,085 68 || Kansas . . . . . . . . . . . 40,355 5,658,251 39 Wyorning . . . . . . . . . . | 894 123,220 44 Kentucky . . . . . . . . . 27,783 3,933,336 59 | Louisian 3. . . . . . . . . 6,801 Šć6,793 75|| Totals . . . . . . . . . . . |993, 199|{140,280,375 87 Maine . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19.001 2,910,457 34 Insular Possessions— Maryland . . . . . . . . . 12,791 1,674,830 70 || Philippine Islands . . . 39 7,651 07 Massachusetts . . . . . 40,659 5,276,813 05 || Porto Rico. . . . . . . . . . . 21 2,595 00 Michigan . . . . . . . . . . 42,633 6,558,716 30 || Samoa. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . | 18 00 Minnesota. . . . . . . . . 16,073 2,232,278 91 || In foreign countries. 5, 182 745,972 56. Mississippi . . . . . . . 4,824 634, 108 99 - -- Missouri . . . . . . . . . [ 52,542 7,355,888 78 || Totals . . . . . . . . . . . 398,441 || $141,036,642 (50 Montana. . . . . . . . . . . 2,041 282,657 77|| Payments by TreasNebraska. . . . . . . . . . 16,375 2, 195,106 91 i u r y Department Nevada. . . . . . . . . . . . 335 44,322 26} i (Treasury settleNow Hampshire. . 8,529 | 1,246,486 26|| ments) . . . . . * * * * * * ! . . . . . . . 106,246 83 | New Jersey. . . . . . . ; 21.473 2,499,316 #1 || | | New Mexico. . . . . . . 2,02. 295. 168 47 Grand tolal. . . . . . . }. . . . . . . ; $141,142,861 33Now York. . . . . . . . $9,674 11,971,813 17

The federal pension agents and pension agencies are :

Boston, Mass . . . . . . .

Chicago, Ill.
Columbus, Ohio. . . .
Concord, N. H. . . .

Detroit, Mich. . . . .
Indianapolis, Ind. . .

Buffalo, N. Y. . . . . . .
* * * * * * ...joseph W. Jones.
. . . Hugh Henry.

Bes Moines, IOWa. . . .

Pła Ce. Nanne Of agent.

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. Augustus J. Hoitt,
. Charles A. Orr,
Jonathan Merr arm.

scar A, Janeš
. Albert O. Marsh.

FKnoxville, Tenn. . . . . Willian Rule.
Louisville, Ky. . . . . . . Andrew T. Wood.
Milwaukee, Wis . . . . . Edwin D, Coe,
New-York City. . . . . . Michael PS Grwin,
Philadelphia, Penn . . St. C. A. Mulholland.
Pittsburg, Penn. , . . , John W. Nesbit.
San Francisco, Cal... Jesse B. Fuller.
Topeka, Kan , . . Wilder S. Metcalf.
Washington, D. C. , , John R. King.

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PENSION PAYMENTS AND NUMBER OF PENSIONERS, 105 There were added to the rolls during the year ending June 30, 1905, the names of . 51,865 new pensioners, The number of pensioners lost from the rolls during the year ywas 48,186, showing an increase of 3,679 on the rolls as compared with the close of the o: year 1904. The 998,441 pensioners on the rolls June 30, 1905, were classified as Ollo W8 . War, Revolutionary: r Act June 27, 1890– "Wióow8 * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 1 Mothers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,998 Daughters & e s to 6 to e s - e. e. e. e o & -> S to e a 4 Fathers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 634. War, of 1812; - Helpless children . . . . . . . . . . . . * to: * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * > * * * * * * 776 Army Ill! TSes . . . . . . . . * * * * * * * ~ * 603 st U18 a W3.rs : e t - 1I] . cśiyors .................... }}}}|| "...# **"................... 15,714 WS * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 3,461 Widows to e o- or & B & & M. o. o. o. o. o. & so go 1,068. Moor: 4.540 Minor children . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272. • -" * to e o so o e o e o so e o & & o e o 'o o w Mothers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,957: Widows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7,653 F'ath 373 Civil War: B €I'S e e s o a r s a s - e o a 4 is to * * * * * * * * 9. General law— rothers and sisters. . . . . *-* * * * * * Invalids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219,384 Helpless children . . . . . # or it p or * * * * *- f Widows . . . . . . . . . . . • * * * * * * * * 77,620 | Regular establishment: * Minor - children . . . . . . . . . . . . . 769 Invalids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ; 10,930. Mother's & e o e o e is a to e A p * * * * * * * 4,645 - Widows * a s to e s m e o to e o e o o f or o e o e o e s - 2,453 Fathers . . . . . . . . . . . * * * * * * * * * - 776 Minor children . . . . . . . . . to e g o e o so o 115, * Brothers and sisters . . . . . . . . . 195 Mothers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . o e 714 Helpless children . . . . . . . . to so 472 Fathers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * † - © G - 108 | Act June 27, 1890– Brothers arid sisters. . . . . . . . . . . . e 6 Invalids • * * * * r * * * * * * * * * or to to go. 465,224 Helpless children • * * * * * * * * * * * * * 7 | Widows......'..... . . . . . . . . . . 169,066 Minor children . . . . . . . . . . . . . . | 4, 177 Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 998,441 i i PENSION PAYMUENTS AND NUMBER OF PENSIONERS. t Pension payments, the cost of the pension establishment and the number of pen(, ioners carried on the roll from 1865–66 to 1904–'05 are shown in the following table : | Cost, main— Number of | - Year. Paid as persions. tenance, etc. Total. *- pensioners. 1865. . . . . . * * * * $15,450,549 88 $407, 365 00 $15,857,714 88 126,72: i S07 . . . . . . . . . . 20,784,789 69 490,977 35 21,275,767 04 155,474 1868. . . . . . . . . . 23, 101,509 36 553,020 34 23,654,529 70 , Tó9,643 1869. . . . . . . . . . 28,513,247 27 564,526 81 29,077,774 08 - 187,963 1870. . . . . . . . . . 29,351,48S 78 600,997 86 29,952,486 64 198,686 1871. . . . . . . . . . 2S,518,792 62 863,079 00 29,381,871 62 207,495 1872. . . . . . . . . . 29,752,746 81 951,253 00 30,703,999 81 232, 189 f 1873. . . . . . . . . . 26,982,063 89 1,003, 200 64 27,985,264 53 238,411 1874. . . . . . . . . . 30,206,778 99 966,794 13 31, 173,573 12 236,241 ll 1875. . . . . . . . . 29,270,404 76. 982,605 35 30,253,100 11 234,821 i; 1876. . . . . . . . . . 27,936,209 53 1,015,078 S1 28,951,288 34 232, 137 il 1877 . . . . . . . . . . 28, 182,821 72 1,034,459 3 29, 217,281 05 232, 104 1878. . . . . . . . . . 26,786,009 44 1,032,500 09 27,818,509 53 223,998 il 1879. , ...a-. . . . . 33,664,428 92 837, 734 14 34,502,163 242,755 il 1880. . . . . . . . . . 56,6S9,229 08 935,027 28 57.624,256 36 250,802 is 1881. . . . . . . 4 o' to 50,583,405 35 1,072,059 64 51,655,464 99 268,830 1882. . . . . . . . . . 54,313, 172 05 1,466,236 01 55,779, 40S 06 285,697 | 1883. . . . . . . ... } – 60,427,573 81 2,591,648 29 63,619,222 10 303,658 | 1884. . . . . . . . . . 57,912,387 47 2,835, 181 00 60,747,568 47 322,756. 1885. . . . . . . . . . 65,171,937 12 3,392,576 34 68,564,513 46 $45,123 il 1886. . . . . . . . . . 64,091, 142 90 3,245,016 61 67,336,159 51 3Go,783 v. il 1887 . . . . . . . . . . 73,752,997 OS 3,753, 400 91 77,506,397 99 406,007 1888. . . . . . & © o- o 78,950, 501 67 3,515,057 27 82,465,558 94 452,557 * il 1889. . . . . . . . . . SS,842,720 58 3, 466,96S 40 92,309,688 98 489,725 i 1890. . . . . . . . . . 106,093,850 39 3,526,3S2 13 109,620,232 52 | 537,944 || 1891. . . . . . . . . . 117,312,690 50 4,700, 636 44 122,013.326 94 676, 160 || 1892. . . . . . . . . . 39,394, 147 11 4,898,665 SO is...}}}#} of #6; Hl 1893. . . . . . . . . . 156,906,637 94 4, Sö7,734 42 161,774,372 36 966,012 1894. . . . . . . . . . 139,986,726 17 3,963,976 3 143,950,702 48 969,544 il 1895, . . . . . . . . . 139,812,294 30 4,38S, 0:20 21 144, 150,314 51 970,521 il 1896. . . . . . . . . . 138,220,704 46 3,991,375 (31 142,212,080 07 970, 678 | 1897. . . . . . . . . . 139,949,717 35 3,987,783 07 143,937,500 42 $76,614 | 1898. . . . . . . . . . $44,651,879 80 4, 114,091 46. 148,765,971 26 Q93.714 il 1899. . . . . . . . . . 138,855,052 95 4,147,517 73 142,502,570 6S 351,515 il 1900. . . . . . . . . . ~ +38,462, 130 65 3,841,706 74 142,303,837 39 993,529 H 1901. . . . . . . . . . 138,531,483 84 3,868, 795 4-4 142,400,279 28 997, 735 il 1902. . . . . . . . . . 137,504,267 99 3,831,378 96 141,335,646 95 999,446 il 1903. . . . . . . . . . 137,759,653 71 3,993,216 79 141,752,870 50 996,545 o 904. to go & o a 4 to $ 2 144,993,571 49 3,849,366 25 144, 942, 937 74 ! $994 762 1906. . . . . . . . . . 141,142,861 33 3,721,832 82 144,864,694 15 998.447 Totals. . . . $3,224,414,578 75 || $103,219.133 78 TS3,337,633,712 53 ! –s ----- From July 1, 1790, to Tune 30, 1885, disbursements for pelssons were $96,445,444.23.

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PATENT OFFICE STATIST1CŞ. |

In 1964 there were received 53,168 applications for Inc.chanical patents, 818. applications for design patents, 157 applications for reissues of patents, 2,524 ap- || # plications for regist ration of trademarks, i, 335 applications for registration of it labels and 397 applications for registrailion Cs prints, ... There were 30,824 patents issued, including designs; #1th paterits reissued, and 2,358 tra (tenoiarks, i, 414 - labels and 2'37 prints registered. The n &raber of patents that expired was 20,429. The nun;ber of allowed applications a Wailing the payrnent of final sees was 9,362 and the number forfeited for non-payment of the final sees 5,413. The total receipts were $1,657,326 53, the experiditures $1,476.000 38, and the surplus of receipts over expenditures $181,326 15. The total balance to the credit of , the Patent Coffice in the Treasury of the United States on January 1, 1905, was $5,863,866. 76. w

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In proportion to population more patents were issued to citizens of Connecticut is than to those of any other State—1 to cvery 1,097. Next in order are the follow- # i in g : District of Columbia, 1 to cvery 1,146; Massachusetts, to Cvery 1,351; i. ; Colorado, 1 to every 1,394; New-Jersey, 1 to every 1, 452; California, 1 to every # 1,453; Rhode Island, 1 to every 1,509 ; New-York, 1 to overy 1,614; Illinois, 1 to # every 1, 673; Washington i to every i,693 ; Ohio, 1 to every 1,908 ; Pennsylvania, + to every 2,064 : Michigan, 1 to every -2,543 ; Montana. * to every 2,563 ; Oregon, 3 to overy 3,0S6; Oklahoma, Ł to every 3,264; Missouri, 1 to every 3,361 ; Wyoming, # 1 to every 3, 3}4; Minnesota, 1 to every 3,474; Iowa, 1 to every 3,483; Wisconsin, 1 to every 3,555; todiana, 1 to every 3,569; Arizona, # to every 3,841; Vermont, 1 to every 3,949; Maryland, 1 to every 4, 117; Utah, 1 to every 4,130; Nevada, 1 to every 4.233; Kansas, to eyery 4,376; South Dakota, 1 to every 4,724; Nebraska, i, to every 4,749 : Idaho. 1 to every 4,758; Leia ware 1 to every 4,992; New-Harripshire, i to every 5,415: Maine, 1 to every 5,739; West Virginia, 1 to every 6,030; North Dakota, i to every 6,382; New-Mexico. 1 to every, 5,510; Florida, 1 to every 6, 9.4: Texas, 1 to overy 7,346; Virginia, i to every 7,957; Kentucky, 1 to every 8,420; }; Tennessee, 1 to every 3,486, and Georgia, 1 to every 8,983. The fewest patents granted in proportion to the number of jnha,\xitants were in the following States and Territories; Alaska, 1 to every 31,720; Iławaii, 1 to every 22,000; South Carojina, 1 to every 19, 147; Mississippi. 3 to every 17, 236; North Carolina, 1 to every 13,272; Arkansas, I to every 13,115; Alabama,...}, to every 12,633; Indlars o'erritory, 1 to every 10,887, and Louisiana, 3 to every 19,984. || Of foreign patents, 910 were granted to citizens; of Cerunassy; $36) to those of || . England, 412 to those of Canada, 331 to those of France, 113 to those of Austria- i. jiungary, 87 to , those of Switzerland, , 89 to those of Scotland, , 73 to those of . Sweden, 53 to those of New-Zealand. 48 to those of Victoria, 42 to those of Bel-off gigo., 37 to those of Russia, 28 to throse of Mexico. 26 to those of Ireland, 25 to || joo Now’south waies, 23 to those of Norway, 22 each to those of Penmark || and Italy, 20 to those of the Netherhands. I 1 to those of Spain, 10, each to those. ... India and the Transvaal), 7 to those of Queensland, 5 each to those of Argen: ; tina, Cuba, South Australia and Western A astralia; 4 each to those of Japan and it orkey, 3 each to those of Brazil, Costa Rica and Newfound far, d: 2 each to those || of Capé Colony, China, Natal, Rungaria. §o Salvador a sid Tasmania, and 1 oach || § those of Africa, Bermuda, Colombia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Isle of Man, Java, so Persia, Peru and Portoga}. E.

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- * PASSPORT REGULATIONS. - o The law forbids the granting of a passport to any perso not a citizen of the.}}

; taies, or loyal resident of an insukar possession of the Uniteå, States. Aft #: §“ia. only made the declaration of intention to become, a citizen earnet #

* -- assport. No one’but the Secretary of State may grant and issue pass-i: ET join”: #:a States. A person who is entitled to receive a passport, if: tem— ;, porarijy abroad, shook; apply to the diplomatie representative of the United States# in the country where he happen: to be, or: #3, the absence of a diplomatic representa–3. tive, to the Consul-General of the tjnited States, or, in the absence of both, to a #: ...out of the United States. The Hecessary statements oay be made before the $earest consular Officer. Application for a passport by a person in one of the insular jois"... the finited States should be made to the Chłof Executive of sueh pos-i: jo. The evidence required of a perfor making applicatkom abroad or in an insujar passession of the United States is the same as that required. Of an applicant in # h 4→ States. - the §otion. in the form of an affidavit, Faust be attested by an officer || | authorized to administer oaths. The applica Pat is required to state the date and {i} place of his birth, ho occupation, the place of his permanent residence, and who him what length of time, he intends to return to the United States with the purpose of residing aird performing the duties of citizenship therein. The applicant invast take §. “...in" of ailegiance to the Government of thooted States. The application # must be accompanied by * description stating, the following aorticulars: Age, stature, # forehead, eyeB, nose, mouth. chin, hair, complexion, face, and by a certificate from at least oné credible witness that the applica;it #3 the person he ro. himself to be, a j that the facts stated in the affidavit are true to the best of the witness's knowledge # * #on of the Chinese race, alleging birth is the United States, must accom– is pany his application with supporting affidavits from at least two eredio.e witnesses, preferably not of the Chinese race, having personal knowledge of the applicant's #xth in the United States. A person born abroad whose father was a native citizen : # the United States midst show that his father was born on the £3nited States, resided

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1zed citizen. A resident of an insular possession of the United States who owes must submit affidavits from at least two credible witnesses having good means of

: Issued upon a new application, and, if the applicant be a naturalized citizen, the old | passport will be accepted in lieu of a certificate of naturalization, if the application

|| to state the fact, giving the respective ages of the children, and the allegiance of the ! servant, when one passport Will suffice for all. For any other person in the party a | separate passport will be required. A woman's passport may include he minor chil—

#| or Turkish territory should have their. passports Viséd (countersigned) by a Russia | Turkish consular representative. In this country before sailing. Thére is I}OW o

#|tion domiciled in the United States or located, in any foreign country which,

|foreign nations or with Indian tribe; (b) Any citizen or resident of this coo #|ing the protection of his trade-mark in any foreign country the laws of wh

| class of merchandise, and the particular goods comprised in such c

TRADE-MARK LAWS. 107 |

therein, and was a citizen at the time of the applicant’s birth. ... The department may 1%quire that this affidavit be supported by that of one other citizen acquainted with the facts. A naturalized citizen must transmit his certisicate of naturalization, or a âuly certified copy of the court record thereof, with his application. He must state in his assidavit when and from What port he emigrated to this country, what ship he sailed in, where he has lived since his arrival in the United States, when and before what court he was naturalized, and that he is the identical person described in the certificate of naturalization. If a worman making application is unmarried she should state that she has never been married. If she is the Wise or Widow of a native citizen of the United States the fact should be made to appear. If she is the Wife or Widow of a naturalized citizen she must transmit for inspection her husband's certificate of naturalization, . must state that she is the wife (or widow) of the person described therein, and must set forth the facts of his emigration, naturalization and residence, as required in the rule governing the application of a naturalized citizen. A married woman's citizenship follows that of her husband so far as her international status is concerned. It is essential, therefore, that a Woman's marital relations be indicated in her appli– cation for a passport, and that in f'.e case of a married Worman her husband's citizenship be established. . The child of a raturalized citizen claiming citizenship through the naturalization of the parent must state that be or she is the son or daughter, as the case nay be, of the person described in the certificate of naturalization, which must be submitted for inspection, and must set forth the facts of emigration, natural– ization and residence, as -required in the rule governing the application of a natural

allegiance to the United States must state that he owes allegiance to the United States and that he does not acknowledge all legiance to any other government, and

knowledge in substantiation of his statements of birth, residence and loyalty. A passport expires two years from the date of issuance. A new one will be

upon which it was issued is found to contain sufficient information as to the naturalization of the applicant. When the applicant is accompanied by his wife, minor children or servant who would be entitled to receive a passport, it will be sufficient

: dren and servant under the above-named conditions. The term servant does not include a governess, tutor, pupil, companion or person holding like relations to the applicant for a passport. Professional and other titles will not be inserted in passports. r By act of Congress, a fee of $1 is required to be collected for every citizen's passport. That amount in currency QP postal money order should accompany each application made by a citizen of the United States. Orders should be made payable || to the disbursing clerk of the Department of State. . . Drafts or checks will not be accepted. Blank forms of application will be furnished by the department. The Secretary of State may refuse to issue a passport to any one who he has reason to believe desires it to further an unlawful or improper purpose.

s Passports, are, not required. In the Argentine Republic, Belgium, Bolivia, Brazil |Chili, Colombia, Costa Rica, Denmark and possessions, Great Britain and possessions, : Guatemala, Honduras, Japan, Liberia, Mexico, Nicaragua, Norway, Paraguay, Feru. *Portugal and possessions, Salvador, Sweden and Uruguay. It is recommended, how." ever, that Americans intending to Visit those countries be provided with passports sor convenience to travel without interruption; . The laws of the following &Suntries. require that every: foreigner must be provided with a passport before entering their #domains: , Austria-Hungary, Dominican Republic, Germany, Greece, Hayti, Nieth. : Hands and possessions, Persia, Rumania, Russia, Servia, Turkey and possessions and ;Venezuela. As a general rule it is Wise, for persons intending travelling abroad OtltŠide of British dominions, where passports are never demanded, to provide themselves ; with passports before, leaving the United States. Persons intending to enter Russian

by the State Department, with each pāSSport, issued to a naturalized citizé §oolai statement showing What his status Will be under the laws of the tov o: lais origin if he returns. - *

I TRAHDE-MARK LAWS.

The following classes may obtain registration: (a) Any person, firm or

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* - - - * - by tr r convention or law, affords similar privileges to citizens of the United States, oão

is entitled to the exclusive, use of, any trado-mark and uses the same in comroe. With

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t = a ich * registration in the United . States as a condition precedent. An application jo.

registration of a trade-mark will consist of a statement or Specification, a declaration

| or oath, and drawing, which must follow rules laid down. These should be preceded

by a brief letter of advice, requesting registration , and signed by the a

statement should anneunce the full name, citizenship, domicile, #so."jago. business of the applicant (or, if, the applicant, be a corporation, under to: laws of what State or, nation incorporated). With to full and clear specification of the trade— mark. It should state from What time the trade—mark has been used by the applicant, the

lass to which the

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