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to us, took us under their authoritie, unto which we subscribed and subjected ourselves, under whose protection to continue we account it not the least part of our securitie and happinesse.

6thly. Because we conceive the confirming of the Mass. Patent in its due extent, in respect of its antiquity, nulls all patents whatsoever, as fully in titles of lands as of government, from both which we expect equall freedom, by their justice and our own subjection.

Our humble request therefore is that your goodnesse would favor our reasonable entreaties, whose weaknesse calls for support, our manners for some strictness of rule, whose distractions for some present settlement; wherein our voate is that it may be as it is under the government of ye Mass. against which if changes should interpose our inevitable troubles would follow our condition as it was in part, and as it now stands, lyes really before your gracious eye, although not so methodically presented, for which we hope our ignorance will excuse us, touching which if your Highnesse expect any further information, we beseech

your Commands herein for a pyous and Reverend friend of ours, Mr. John Wheelwright sometimes of us, now in England, unto whom our estate is well knowne, and is fully able to satisfy any material inquiries therein, Craving pardon for our over much boldnesse and prolixity as our duties are, so pray wee for the Almighty's protection to secure your person, his spirit to guide, his blessing to croun your high and memorable endeavours with continued successe for the advancement of his own glory and kingdom and your happinesse here and eternally. Aug. 12, 1656. Tho. Williams,

Rob. Wadley,
Robert Booth,

John Allcocke,
Richard Hitchcox,

Charles Frost,
John Leighton,

Humph. Chadborn,
Ralph Trustrum,

Edw. Johnson,
Walter Newell, (mark.)

Henry Norton,
Rich. Coman,

Silvester Stover, (mark.)
Rob't Weymouth, (mark.)

Sampson Anger, (mark.)
Jno. Diamont,

Jno. Parker,
Wm. Scadlock,

Jno. Barret, sen.,
Wm. Renolds,

Sam. Austine,

Morgan Howell,

Griffin Montague, (mark.] Edw. Clark,

Miles Thompson, Gregory Jeffrys,

Dan. Goodwin, Nich. Bully, sen., (mark.)

Hen. Symons, Roger Hill,

Hugh Gullison, Henry Waddock,

Roger Plaisted, Wm. Horkett,

Tho. Spencer, (mark.] Nich. Bully, (mark.]

Wm. Dixon, (mark.] Hen. Boad,

John Smith, (mark.] Jno. West,

Tho. Courtous, James Heard,

Sam, Twisden, Abra. Preble,

Abra. Cowley, (mark] Nich. Frost, (mark.)

Nath. Lord, (mark.] Edw. Rishworth,

Tho. Jones. (mark.) Peter Wyre,

Wm. Symons, Robt. Knight, (mark.)

Rob. Mendum, (mark.) Nich. Davis,

Wm. Spencer, Rich. Bankes,

Francis Raynes,
George Parker,

Hen. Donnell,
Fletcher,

Jos. Emerson,
Ezek. Knight,

Tho. Wheelwright, Wm. Hammon,

John Davis, Nich. Coole,

John Twisden,
Jno. Gouch, sen.,

Philip Hatch, (mark.]
Jno. Gouch, jun.,
This is a true copie compared with its original.
Attest,

Edm. Rawson, Secretary.

IX.

LETTER FROM EDWARD RISHWORTH TO Gov. ENDICOTT, 1656.

To the Right Worshipful John Endicott, Gov., &c.

Aug. 14, 1656. Right Worshipful, I have not been wanting, although with some difficulty, (and ye more in respect of my own weaknesse and other opposition,) according to the best of my skill and knowledge of the state of things amongst us, to draw together the counsels of the best part, I hope, if not the greatest part of our inhabitants for the effecting of which being effected will conduce, as we trust, to our future good; In the accomplishment wbereof among many who have subscribed, I meet such an unexpected readinesse of rationall complyance as gives me some encouraging persuasions that these scattered intimations of our honest desires to his highnesse may introduce some for the con. firmation of our continued settlement under your authority, being unfeignedly the end of our requests, as this inclosed petition of ours more at large doth and may

demonstrate. Sir, being at Sacoe not many days since, I could not but take notice of some discontent and trouble of spirit in several of them about the apprehending Jno. Bonighton, whom I really believe want rather of corage than cowardize doth only retract their resolutions from the faithful discharge of their dutys therein, which occasionally kindleth his impudence soe much the more to the exorbitant abuse both of our authority and themselves ; And might I presume to utter my own weaknesses under correction, if the Gen. Court should thinke meete to commissionate Mr. Francis Raynes our Lieut., or some else in our County with sufficient power or assistance, the matter I conceive prudently

attended would be easily affected without any great damage or difficulty and the men of Sacoe removed out of their inextri. cable feares, with which by their own conceate they are soe strangely affected. The truth is they dare not take him. I formerly moved a businesse to your worship and Reverend Mr. Norton, (of whose ****** I rejoice to hear,) about procuring a minister for the people of Newgeawanacke, which hitherto hath lyne dormant, by reason of Mr. Broughton's absence thence, on whom it hath some chief dependence, but we hope shortly to have an opportunity effectually to revive it again.

Sacoe and Cape Porpus are in a greate strayte for some godly minister; for his maintenance they propound fifty pounds per annum, besides a house and some other conveniences, touching which I was moved to write to your worship, which I cannot well be so forward in till the people of Newgewanacke be supplied, altho' I cannot but be sensible of the deepe necessity thereof. Some of Wells and Sacoe I perceive are very

desirous of having the Gen. Court moved that they might have one Magistrate allowed and settled, who lives in the County, or otherwise to have some fitt person or persons joyned in Commission with the Commission of each towne, that upon occasion might have power for more speedy punishment of offenders who by these protractions of **** punishments doth multiply their offences, and at length find a way by escape to avoyd all punishments. Had we persons meetly qualified for such place, the thing were more than needful to be done. This with my service to yourself, the Dep. Gov., and my due respects to Mr. Norton and all the rest of our Christian friends, I leave yourself, yours and all your weighty occasions with the Lord, remaining

Your worship to be commanded

in the Lord, EDWARD RISHWORTH.

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[The first part of this letter undoubtedly relates to the petition to Cromwell, which precedes it in this volume; and we are thus let into the secret that the petition was procured by the exertions of that government to secure its power in this province.)

X.

A LETTER ON THE AFFAIRS OF New ENGLAND, 1663 OR 1664.

SIR - I have been divers times with Col. Temple at his lodging," whom I find to be a reall cordial gentleman for poor N. E., who hath not wanted for foes, for I will tell you, sir, what not only I but a ten or a dozen besides myself can testify, which I doubt not but is writt by other hands to N. E.

Sir, the first day that Col. Temple came to the Exchange after he had been at Court, he went off to the Sunne to Dummer,' and I think most of N. E. men was there, amongst the rest was Mr. Mavericke ; Col. Temple was then pleased to tell us what he had said to the King in behalf of N. E., which was very much and speeke merrylie as you know his manner is, and said for all those affidavies or oaths that are given in against the Country, yett I will hold six to four N. E. hath their liberty contrary to expectation. Mr. Mavericke thought to have found him far otherwise and of his judgment: Mr. Mavericke said before all the Company that N. E. were all rebels and he would prove them so, and that he had given in to the council so, but I think he will be shamed of it.

To morrow evening N. E. business is to be heard at the Council table, and we intend to be there.

Sir, you need not fear but N. E. will enjoy their libertys as ever, and conserning the Quakers, I tell you what Col. Temple

[*This Col. Temple was Thomas, afterward Sir Thomas, who was Governor of Acadia by Cromwell's appointment He contrived to be on good terms with Charles II., and thus to render aid to New England. He was a large speculator in lands here. He died in London, in 1674.)

1 Jeremiah Dummer, agent for Massachusetts, and Samuel Maverick, afterwar done of the Commissioners to New England.

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