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CHAPTER IX.

FORT LOYAL-SAW MILLS TAXED FOR ITS SUPPORT-DEED OF FALMOUTH TO TRUSTEES-GOVERNMENT OF

ANDROSS, NEW PATENTS FOR LAND REQUIRED—FRENCH EMIGRANTS—ROADS AND FERRIES—BUSINESS OF THE TOWN AND ITS INTERNAL CONDITION—QUARREL BETWEEN LAWRENCE AND DAVIS.

CHAPTER X.

POPULATION IN 1689–COMMENCEMENT OF THE SECOND INDIAN WAR-ANDROSS VISITS MAINE-His

AUTHORITY SUBVERTED-RENEWAL OF HOSTILITIES_ATTACK ON FALMOUTH RESISTED-SECOND ATTACK AND DESTRUCTION OF THE Town.

CHAPTER XI.

A BRIEF NOTICE OF SOME OF THE INHABITANTS OF FALMOUTH DURING THE SECOND SETTLEMENT—NAMES

OF THE SETTLERS.

APPENDIX

NO. I.

RECORD OF AN ACTION IN 1640, CLEEVES v. WINTER, FOR DISTURBING HIS POSSESSION AT SPURWINK, WITH

THE PLEADINGS AND VERDICT.

NO. II.

PETITION OF ROBERT JORDAN IN 1648 TO THE COURT OF LIGONIA, FOR LEAVE TO APPROPRIATE TRELAWNY'S

PROPERTY IN HIS HANDS TO THE PAYMENT OF WINTER'S CLAIM AGAINST TRELAWNY'S ESTATE ; PROCEEDINGS OF THE COURT THEREON, AND AN INVENTORY OF THE PROPERTY. ALSO A STATEMENT OF THE ACCOUNT.

NO. III.

ACTION IN 1640, CLEEVES v. WINTER FOR DISTURBING HIS POSSESSION ON THE NECK, WITH THE PLEADINGS.

NO. IV.

LEASE FOR 2000 YEARS FROM SIR FERDINANDO GORGES TO CLEEVES AND TUCKER OF PART OF FALMOUTH, DATED JANUARY 27TH, 1637.

NO. V.

EXTRACT FROM JOHN JOCELYN'S VOYAGES, SHOWING THE SITUATION OF THE SEVERAL TOWNS IN THE

PROVINCE ABOUT 1670.

NO. VI.

ROBERT JORDAN'S WILL, 1679.

NO. VII.

INDIAN DEED TO GEORGE MUNJOY OF LAND AT AMMONCONGIN, JUNE 4, 1666.

NO. VIII.

THOMAS DANFORTH'S DEED TO THE TRUSTEES OF FALMOUTH, 1684.

NO. IX.

LETTERS TO GEORGE BRAMHALL, 1687 AND 88, AND RECEIPTS FROM HIM AND SILVANUS Davis.

INTRODUCTORY CHAPTER,

A BRIEF ACCOUNT OF THE VARIOUS SETTLEMENTS ON THE COAST OF MAINE, PREVIOUS TO 1632.

In the beginning of the year 1603, there was not one European family on the whole coast of America, from Florida to Greenland. There had been made, previous to this time, three attempts to settle Virginia, and one in 1602 by Gosnold, to plant a colony on the southern shores of Massachusetts ; all of which failed. The whole coast of North America was now open to European enterprise, and although discouragements had hitherto attended the efforts of commercial speculation, yet it was not disheartened. In 1603, new exertions were made, which resulted in bringing the coast of Maine more into notice, and preparing the way for future settlements upon it. On the eighth of November of that year, Henry 4th of France, granted a charter of Acadia and the neighboring country to Du Mont", extending from forty to forty-six degrees of north latitude. Du Mont having received a commission as Lieutenant-general of France, the next year fitted out an expedition in company with Champlain and others, with which he sailed

1 Prince's N. E. Chro. p. 1.

2 Prince's Intro., p. 104. 3 Hazard, vol. I, p. 45. This included the whole country from Philadelphia to the St. Lawrence, nominally, but never in practise extending west of the Kennebeck river. Du Mont took possession of all the territory east of Kennebec river for the king of France. Sul, Hist. of M. pp. 52, 55.

along the coast of Maine, formed a temporary settlement at the mouth of the river St. Croix, where his company spent one winter, and then established a colony on the other side of the bay of Fundy, at a place which they named Port Royal and now called Annapolis.* Du Mont, in two or three years afterward withdrew his attention from Acadia and turned his trade to the St. Lawrence. Poutrincourt, one of his companions in the settlement of Port Royal, sent his son Biencourt home in 1608, for supplies of men and provisions for the colony. The Jesuits, ever zealous for the propagation of their faith, seized this occasion to send over two of their order, Biard and Masse, to take charge of the spiritual concerns of the new plantation, and probably also to extend their regards to those of the Aborigines. But the priests having assumed to control the civil affairs of the plantation, soon quarreled with the government, and Biencourt, who, on the return of his father to France, had become the leader of the colony, caused them to remove to an island on the coast of Maine, then called Mont Mansellf now Mount Desert. Here they planted gardens, laid out grounds, and entered on

*[An interesting account of this first attempt to establish a colony in Maine, is given by Les Carbot, who accompanied it as chaplain and historian. His work was first published in Paris in 1609 and has passed through many editions in the original and translation. It was translated into English the first year after its publication. Among the other companions of Du Mont were M. du Pont Gravé and M. de Poutrincourt, who established the colony at Port Royal.]

tí Madame Guercheville, a zealous Catholic lady, with a view to propagandism, sent out Biard and Masse in 1611. In March, 1613, she sent another colony to the aid of her first missionaries, which arrived at Port Royal, May 16. Thence, they soon after sailed, intending to establish a mission at the mouth of the Penobscot river. Owing to adverse winds and fogs, they put into a fine harbor on the south-eastern side of Mount Desert, with which they were so much pleased, that they concluded to make that place the center of their operations. Biard says the savages called the island Pemetig. Champlain gave it the name of Mount Desert and the English, that of Mount Mansell, in honor of Sir Robert Mansell, one of the Plymouth patentees. Biard, after the capture by the English returned to France where he died in 1622.]

the work of their mission. But they were not permitted long to enjoy even this state of seclusion. Disputes had already arisen between the English and French, respecting the boundaries of the grants from their respective governments, which, from want of information relating to the situation of the country, run with strange perplexity into one another. The French occupied Port Royal, St. Croix, Mount Desert, and the mouth of the Penobscot, and had erected forts at each of those places for their protection. The fort erected by the French on Mount Desert was called St. Sauveur. The disposition of the French to extend their settlements still further west, was viewed with alarm by the government established in Virginia, and in 1613, they sent Capt. Argall to dislodge them. In the summer of this year, he seized the forts at Mount Desert, St. Croix, and Port Royal, and carried their ship and pinnace, together with their ordnance, cattle, and provision to Jamestown." The French power in this quarter was thus interrupted, and it was a number of years before it recovered from this disaster.

The name of Acadie is first given to the territory between forty and forty-sixth degrees of north latitude, in the grant from Henry 4th to Du Mont. The origin of the name is lost. Douglass says it is derived from Arcadia in Greece. The French in the treaty of St. Germain, call the country Lacadie, which Prince Anglicises Laccady?.* The English

1 Belknap Biog., p. 340.

2 Hutch. land titles in Maine p. 2. 3 Sullivan, p. 156,

4 Prince, vol. I, p. 37. 5 Prince, vol. i, p. 305.

6 Hazard, vol. i, p. 319. 7 Hazard, vol. ii, p. 78. Some writers have supposed this name to be derived from a tribe of Indians in that territory called the Passamaquoddy or Passamacadie tribe.

*[Mr. Porter Bliss, long a resident among the Seneca Indians, and who has a good understanding of the Indian language, in 1861 informed me that Acadi is a pure Micmac word, meaning "place,” and is always used in combination with some explanatory word, as Suga-bun-Acadi, the place of ground nuts, the present Shebenacadi in Nova Scotia ; Umskegu-Acadi, Great Meadow, Grand Pré, Passam-Acadi, a place of fish.)

occupied the country exclusively as far east as the Kennebec, and the French, except when dispossessed by treaty or actual force, had exclusive occupation as far west as the Penobscot. The country between these two rivers was debatable land, both parties continually claiming it, and each occupying it by intervals. In the commission to the French governor before the treaty of Utrecht in 1713, Acadia is described as extending to the Kennebec, and the whole was then ceded to the English. But in the construction of that treaty, the French restricted the territory to Nova Scotia. In fact the limits of the province were extremely indefinite, and the title depended upon possession, which was continually fluctuating.

The colony of Du Mont was undoubtedly the first attempt to plant upon the coast of Maine, and continued longer than any other which did not become permanent.

The expedition of Du Mont, (with the voyage of Martin Prinn in 1603, and the very successful exploration of the coast of Maine, between the Penobscot and Kennebec rivers, of which a glowing account was given by Rosier,] drew the attention of the English to this side of the Atlantic ; and in April, 1606, a charter was procured for the large extent of territory lying between the thirty-fourth and forty-fourth degrees of north latitude, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific ocean. This large tract was divided between two colonies; the first, stretching to the forty-first degree of north latitude, was bestowed upon a London company, and called South Virginia, the northern part was called North Virginia, and was granted to a company of adventurers in the town of Plymouth. Each colony had a distinct council of thirteen appointed by the king for the management of its affairs.?

Under this charter, the adventurers sent out colonies in 1607.

1 Hutch. vol. iii, p. 3. Memorials of the English and French Commissioners, respecting the limits of Nova Scotia, London, 1755.

2 Hazard, vol. i, p. 50.

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