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statement of the dates, places, and other details of the specific acts said to have been committed by Mr. Joseph B. Walsh, upon which the warrant was issued for his arrest on the 8th March last, at Castlebar, county Mayo, Ireland.

In reply, I beg leave to remind you tbat, in the letter which I had the honor to address to you on the 28th ultimo, it was pointed out that Her Majesty's Government consider that no distinction can be made in these circumstances between foreigners and British subjects, and that, in the case of the latter, the only information given is that contained in the warrant.

I regret, therefore, that I am not in a position to be able to supply you with further details respecting the arrest of Mr. Walsh. I have, &c.,

GRANVILLE.

No. 11.

Earl Granville to Mr. Drummond.

FOREIGN OFFICE, July 9, 1881. SIR: With reference to my dispatch to Sir E. Thornton of the 1st instant, I transmit, for your information, copies of a further correspondence which bas passed between Mr. Lowell and this department relative to the arrest of Mr. Joseph B. Walsb.* I am, &c.,

GRANVILLE.

No. 12.

Mr. Lowell to Earl Granville.

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

London, September 1, 1881. (Received September 2.) My LORD: I have the honor to acquaint you that I have to-day received a letter from Mr. B. H. Barrows, the consul of the United States at Dublin, inclosing a communication, dated the 30th ultimo, that had been made to him by Mr. Joseph B. Walsh, a prisoner arrested under the protection act, and confined in Kilmainham jail.

Mr. Walsh is a naturalized citizen of the Voited States, and I was instructed some time since to inquire into the circumstances of his arrest.' My action in his case, and in other similar cases, is still the subject of correspondence between myself and my government. Whatever may be the tinal decision in regard to this, Mr. Walsh's statements in his letter to Mr. Barrows are such that it is proper I should lose no time in communicating them to your lordship. He says that his health is very much impaired, and that further imprisonment would be dangerous to his life. He desires that a medical examination may be made into the truth of his statement.

I should be much obliged to your lordship if you would make such representations to the proper authorities as to cause this to be done, and to have this man liberated from prison if practicable.

It is proper to add that Mr. Blaine, in his instructions to me upon his arrest, says that Walsh's " character as a law-abiding and good citizen is vouched for by wellknown and respectable citizens of Pennsylvania.” I have, &c.,

J. R. LOWELL.

No. 13.

Earl Granville to Mr. Lowell.

FOREIGN OFFICE, September 2, 1881. SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 1st instant, urging the release from prison, on the ground of ill-health, of Mr. Joseph B. Walsh, who was arrested at Castlebar, in the month of March last, under the protection of persons and property (Ireland) act, 1881.

* Nos. 9 and 10.

In reply, I beg leave to state to you that I have lost no time in referring your letter to the proper department of Her Majesty's Government, and that I shall 'not fail to communicate further with you upon this subject. I am, &c.,

GRANVILLE.

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No. 14.

Earl Granville to Mr. Hoppin.

FOREIGN OFFICE, November 11, 1881. SIR: With reference to my letter to Mr. Lowell of the 20 September last, I have now the honor to state to you that an order was issued on the 21st ultimo, by direction of the lord lieutenant of Ireland, for the discharge of Mr. Joseph B. Walsh, who has been imprisoned at Kilmainham under the protection of person and property (Ireland) act, 1881.

A copy of this order is inclosed herewith, confidentially, for your information, from which you will perceive that it has been issued on the ground of the ill-health of the prisoner. I am, &c.,

GRANVILLE.

No. 15.

Earl Granville to Mr. West.

FOREIGN OFFICE, November 12, 1881. SIR: With reference to my dispatch to Mr. Drummond of the 9th July last, I transmit herewith for your information, copies of a further correspondence I have had with the legation of the United States, in this country, relative to the arrest of Mr. Joseph B. Walsh, who has been imprisoned at Kilmainham under the protection of person and property act in Ireland, 1881, and has now been released by direction of the lordlientenant of Ireland, on the ground of the ill health of the prisoner. * I am, &c.,

GRANVILLE.

No. 16.

Mr. Hoppin to Earl Granville.

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

London, November 14, 1881. (Received November 15.) My LORD: I have the honor to acknowledge the reception of your lordship's letter of the 11th instant, acquainting me with the release from Kilmainham prison of Mr. Joseph B. Walsh, and inclosing, confidentially, the order for his discharge. I shall not fail to communicate, by an early opportunity, this information to the Department of State. I have, &c.,

W. J. HOPPIN.

No. 17.

Mr. Lowell to Earl Granville,

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

London, December 23, 1881. (Received December 24.) My LORD: I have received to-day from Mr. Blaine a dispatch stating that Mr. P. C. O'Connor, of Baltimore, Ma., bas informed the Department of State that his brother, Mr. Denis H. O'Connor, a naturalized American citizen, has, without cause, been ar

* Nos. 12 and 14.

rested and imprisoned by the British authorities in Ireland on suspicion of being in sympathy with the Irish National Land League.

Mr. Blaine incloses a copy of the certificate of the naturalization of Denis H. O'Connor, and also of a letter from P. C. O'Connor above mentioned, by which it appears that the said Denis went to Ireland about four years ago, and engaged in general drapery business in Charleville, in the county of Cork, under the firm name of O'Connor and Malony, and in Kilmallock, Limerick County, under the firm name of D. H. O'Connor and Co. It is further stated that his incarceration, if continued, may prove fatal, as his health is not good, and may also ipjure him financially, as he is at the head of the two business establishments, with all his means at present in the bands of strange clerks and salesmen.

Uuder these circumstances, Mr. Blaine instructs me to bring this subject to the attention of your lordship, with the request that I may be informed as to the grounds upon which Mr. O'Connor was arrested and imprisoned. I bave, &c.,

J. R. LOWELL.

No. 18.

Earl Granrille to Mr. Lowell,

FOREIGN OFFICE, December 30, 1881. Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 23d instant, requesting, on bebalf of your government, to be informed as to the grounds upon which Denis H. O'Connor was arrested and imprisoned by the British authoritie sin Ireland; and I have the bonor to acquaint you, in reply, that I have referred your application to the proper department of Her Majesty's Government. I have, &C.,

GRANVILLE.

No. 19.

Earl Granville to Mr. Lowell.

FOREIGN OFFICE, January, 26, 1882. Sir: With reference to my letter of the 30th ultimo, I have the honor to acquaint you that Her Majesty's secretary of state for the home department has forwarded to me a copy of a communication which he has received from the lord lieutenant of Ireland, in which the latter states that Denis Hayes O'Connor was arrested on the 22d October last, under his excellency's warrant issued pursuant to the protection of person and property (Ireland) act, 1881, on the ground" that he was reasonably suspected of inciting to intimidation against the payment of rent. His excellency proceeds to state that he has no reason to doubt the propriety of the arrest, but will, however, cause inquiry to be made with the view of considering whether the prisoner could now be discharged without danger to the peace of the district.

1 shall not fail to communicate to you anything further which I may hear upon the subject. I have, &c.,

GRANVILLE.

• No. 20.

Earl Granville to Mr. Lowell.

FOREIGN OFFICE, February 2, 1882. Sır: With reference to my letter of the 30th December last, I bave been informed by Her Majesty's secretary of state for the home department that he did not fail to refer to the lord lieutenant of Ireland your communication on the subject of Denis Hayes O'Connor, now in custody under the protection of person and property (Ireland) act, 1881, but that his excellency bas expressed his regret that he cannot, consistently with his duty, order the prisoner's release at present. I have, &c.,

GRANVILLE.

No. 21.

Mr. Jest to Earl Granville.

WASHINGTON, January 25, 1882. (Received February 12.) My LORD: I have the honor to inform your lordship that the Committee on Foreigu Affairs bas reported back to the House a resolution to the following effect:

"That the President be requested to obtain from the British Government a list of all American citizens, naturalized or native-born, under arrest or imprisonment by authority of said government, with a statement of the causes of such arrest or imprisonment, especially of such citizens as may have been thus arrested and imprisoned under a suspension of habeas corpus in Ireland, and if not incompatible with the public interest, that he communicate such information as he receives, together with all the correspondence now on file in the Department of State relating to any existing arrest or imprisonment of citizens as aforesaid ;" upon which Mr. Robinson, of New York, made a violent speech, copy of which is herewith inclosed, against the British Government, and said, alluding to the prohibition of the importation of hogs into England from America some time ago, which created so much sensation, “Oh! that we only paid as much attention, as much honor, to a live American citizen as we do to a dead Cincinnati hog! I called Mr. Frelinghuysen's attention to the terms of this resolution, and to the language used in debate upon it, but he said he had no knowledge of any such resolution as I had now alluded to, and which I showed to him, nor could he tell me what was likely to be the ultimate fate of it. I remarked to Mr. Frelinghuysen that, although not much importance need be attached to such language as that used by Mr. Robinson, still the wording of the resolution was calculated to produce a bad effect, and might cause unnecessary irritation.

Mr. Frelinghuysen said he would make inquiries as to what had taken place in the committee respecting the resolution. I bave, &c.,

L. S. SACKVILLE WEST.

(Inclosure in No. 21.1

[Extract from the National Republican of January 24, 1882.). Mr. Robinson, of New York, took the floor to discuss the resolution. He related how, some months ago, he had met the late English minister, and how that gentleman had stated to him that some American hogs of bad character had been taken over to England for consumption. The wires under the Atlantic had flashed the news of outrages that were about to be perpetrated upon the dead Ohio hog. At the same time, American citizens, who had fought upon the battle-fields of the Union, whose blood had given additional redness to the Stripes and brightened the glory of the Stars, were thrown into prison without any crime being alleged against them, were tried as felons, and were without any opportunity to get their cases before the Government of the people of the United States. He (Mr. Robinson) had been led to exclaim : "Oh! that we only paid as much attention, as much honor, to a live American citizen as we do to a dead Cincinnati hog." But so it was. The State Department would not call up the cases of those citizens and have them examined. There were five American citizens now confined in British bastiles. They had been seized, brought before a jury, tried, and acquitted; but immediately afterward the sospension of the habeas corpus had been brought to bear, they had been rearrested, and were now languishing in prison. He had endeavored to get the cases of these moaning, sickened, dying American citizens before this House, but, until the present time, had been unable to do 80. He was going to move an amendment to the report, and was going to take higher ground than was there taken. Not only had the United States a right to interfere in behalf of American citizens in British prisons, but it had the right, and it was its duty, to demand the release of the members of Parliament elected by the people of Great Britain, and whom the British Government bad imprisoned. "A gentleman bere," continued Mr. Robinson, " shakes his head. I will shake his heart.”

Mr. Robinson then quoted from a speech delivered by Lord John Russell in favor of the British Government interfering to compel the release by the Tuscan Government of certain of its own subjects. Russian despotism bid its head, Turkish tyranny paled into insignificance, and grew pygmyish in comparison with the great wrong and tyranny and despotism that had been inflicted on some of the people of Great Britain.

At this point the matter went over until Tuesday, when it will come up as unfinished business.

No. 22.

Mr. West to Earl Granville.

(Extract.)

WASHINGTON, February 1, 1882. (Received February 18.) With reference to my dispatch of the 25th ultimo, I have the honor to inform your lordship that the House of Representatives, after a long debate, adopted the resolution reported from the Committee on Foreign Affairs, the terms of wbich are as follows:

Resolved, That the President be requested to obtain a list of American citizens, naturalized or native-born, under arrest or imprisonment in Great Britain by autbority of said government, with a statement of the cause or causes of such arrest and imprisonment, and especially of such citizens as have been tbus arrested and imprisoned under the suspension of the habeas corpus in Ireland, and that he communicate such information, when received, to this House, together with all correspondence now on file with the Department of State relating to any existing arrest and imprisonmept of citizens as aforesaid.”

I do not think it necessary to trouble your lordship with comments on the abusive speech of Mr. Robinson, of New York, in support of his amendment, to which no importance was attached, but at the same time I would remark upon the fact of the resoIution having been adopted, as showing the importance attached to conciliating the Irish yote.

Mr. Orth, of Indiana, however, stated, in support of the resolution which he, as a member of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs, reported back to the House, that it was one simply of inquiry, calling upon the State Department to furnish to the House such information as may be accessible in reference to alleged wrongs committed against certain American citizens within the jurisdiction of the British Government, adding that sundry petitions and memorials to this effect which had reached the committee formed the basis of it. In this sense the House adopted the resolution, whereupon Mr. Orth moved to reconsider the vote by which it was adopted, and also that the motion to reconsider be laid on the table.

No. 23.

Mr. Lowell to Earl Granville.

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

London, February 24, 1882. (Received March 1.) My LORD: I have the honor to acquaint you that the Acting Secretary of State has transmitted to me a resolution of the House of Representatives, a copy of which I inclose herewitb, by which the President is requested to furnish the information therein specified concerning the arrest and imprisonment of American citizens by the British Government.

The Acting Secretary desires me to submit to bim a full and accurate report on the subject with as little delay as practicable. As there are many such cases of arrest and imprisonment, of which I cannot conveniently obtain the particulars excepting through the kind offices of your lordship, I respectfully ask that you will cause me to be furnished with the information requested by the resolution, so far as the same may be properly afforded by Her Majesty's Government.

(Inclosure in No. 23.]

RESOLUTION.

FORTY-SEVENTH CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION.

CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES. IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

January 31, 1882. Resolred, That the President be requested to obtain a list of all American citizens, naturalized or native-born, under arrest or imprisonment by authority of the British Government, with a statement of the cause or causes of such arrest and imprisonment, and especially such of said citizens as may bave been thus arrested and imprisoned under the suspension of the habeas corpus in Ireland ; and, if not incom.

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