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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

GENERAL LAND OFFICE,

Washington, D. C., March 25, 1882. Sir: I have the honor to call your attention to the estimate of $469,700 submitted by this office for salaries, fees, and commissions of registers and receivers for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1883. Said estimate was based upon the salaries, fees, and comimissions earned by the officers of 96 offices during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1881, with the addition of the office at Oberlin, Kans., which had then just been opened.

The amount submitted will cover only the compensation of the registers and receivers of the offices now in operation.

There are now pending before Congress Senate bills Nos. 28, 222, and 1531 for the creation of four additional land districts in the States of Colorado, Florida, and Nebraska, two of which, Nos. 28 and 1531, I see by this morning's Record, passed the Senato yesterday. No. 222 has been referred to and received the approval of this office, and all three will, in all probability, become laws.

In addition to the above four offices, House Bill No. 4698 for the creation of two additional ottices in Dakota has passed both Houses of Congress and is now a waiting the approval of the President.

Should the bills above mentioned become laws the amount submitted, $469,700, for salaries, fees, and commissions of registers and receivers during the incoming fiscal year will be inadequate to pay the compensation of the registers and receivers of the 103 offices. It is estimated that the average compensation of each of the new officers will amount to $2,850, aggregating $34,200. The new land districts are created out of districts where there are large and increasing sales of public lands, and the fees and commissions earned by registers and receivers largely in excess of the $2,500 authorized by sections 22:37 and 2240 of the Revised Statutes. The compensation to the reg. isters and receivers of the new would not attect that of the registers and receivers of the old offices. I have therefore to request that the amount heretofore submitted be increased in the sum of $34,200, making in all $503,900.

I also call your attention to the fact that, upon the opening of the new offices, fur. niture, safes, plat-books, &c., will be required, as well as the services of clerks. For the same reason, the estimate of $120,000, submitted “for contingent expenses of land oftices” for the same fiscal year, will not meet the expenses of the 103 offices, and I have to request that it be increased to $140,000.

For the estimates referred to, see pages 187, 188, and 189 of the letter of the honorable Secretary of the Treasury, dated December 5, 1881, transmitting estimates of appropriations required for the service of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1883, to the honorable Speaker of the House of Representatives. Very respectfully,

N. C. MCFARLAND,

Commissioner. Hon. S. J. KIRKWOOD,

Secretary of the Interior.

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1st Session.

No. 149,

TERM OF OFFICE OF INDIAN INSPECTORS AND INDIAN

AGENTS.

MESSAGE

FROM THE

PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED

UNITED STATES,

TRANSMITTING

A communication from the Secretary of the Interior relative to the term of

office of Indian inspectors and Indian agents.

MARCH 30, 1882.-Referred to the Committee on Indians Affairs and ordered to be

printed.

To the Senate and House of Representatives :

I transmit herewith a letter from the Secretary of the Interior, inclosing draft of a bill to amend section 2056 of the Revised Statutes of the United States, relating to the term of office of Indian inspectors and Indian agents. The subject is commended to the consideration of Congress.

CHESTER A ARTHUR. EXECUTIVE MANSION,

March 30, 1882.

.

Washington, March 29, 1882. SIR: I have the honor to inclose herewith the draft of an amendment to section 2056, Revised Statutes United States, relating to the term of office of Indian inspectors and Indian agents.

That section now reads as follows:

"SEC. 2056. Each Indian agent shall hold his office for the term of four years."

The term of office of an Indian agent therefore expires absolutely, and he ceases to be an officer of the department, at the expiration of the term for which he was appointed.

It frequently happens that the term of an agent expires before his successor can be appointed and qualified. In the mean time there is no responsible officer at the agency, and the late agent, although in charge of the agency and of all the public property there, can do no official act

or be bound by department instructions. The want of a provision of law adequate to such cases has long been felt in the Indian service, and the good results of such an enactment are constantly demonstrated in the cases of surveyors-general, registers of land offices, receivers of public moneys, and pension agents, concerning whom the Revised Statutes have provided in terms similar or equivalent to the provisions of the amendment to section 2056 herein proposed.

It is highly desirable that Indian inspectors shall be placed on the same footing as agents, so that an inspector may not cease to be an officer in the midst of an investigation, but may hold his office, as it is proposed that Indian agents may, after the expiration of his commission, and continue in the uninterrupted discharge of his duties until reappointed or relieved by his successor.

I have the honor to recommend the subject to the favorable attention of Congress. I have the honor to be, sir, with great respect, your obedient servant,

S. J. KIRKWOOD,

Secretary The PRESIDENT.

A BILL to amend section 2056 of the Revised Statutes of the United States. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That section 2056 of the Revised Statutes of the United States is hereby amended so as to read as follows: Each Indian inspector and Indian agent shall hold his office for the term of four years and until his successor shall be duly appointed and qualified and shall enter upon the duties of his office; and the existing official bond of any officer so acting shall be deemed good and sufficient and in force until the date of the approval of a new bond to be given by him, if recommissioned, or until relieved by his successor, for the additional time he may continue to act pursuant to the authority of this section.

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A communication from the Secretary of the Interior, submitting an esti

mate for a deficiency appropriation for the Government Hospital for the Insane.

MARCH 30, 1882.-Referred to the Committee on Appropriations and ordered to be

printed.

To the Senate and House of Representatives :

I transmit herewith a communication from the Secretary of the Interior, dated the 28th instant, and the accompanying letter of the Superintendent of the Government Hospital for the Insane, submitting an estimate for a deficiency appropriation of $20,792.51 for the support of that institution for the remaining portion of the present fiscal year.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR. EXECUTIVE MANSION,

March 30, 1882.

• DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

Washington, March 28, 1882. SIR: I have the honor to transmit herewith a letter from the superintendent of the Government Hospital for the Insane, submitting an estimate for a deficiency appropriation of $20,792.51 for the support of that institution for the remaining portion of the present fiscal year.

For the reasons stated, I am of the opinion that the appropriation should be made, and beg leave to recommend that the estimate be transmitted to Congress for its consideration. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. J. KIRKWOOD,

Secretary. The PRESIDENT.

WASHINGTON, D. C., March 25, 1882. SIR: I have the honor to report a probable deficiency of $20,792.51 in the appropriation for the support of the hospital for the year ending June 30, 1882, with a brief

statement of the reasons for the same, and to request tliat it may be transmitted to the proper authorities, to enable Congress to make the necessary provision in the general deficiency bill for the present year.

The estimates for the support of the Government Hospital for the Insane for the year ending June 30, 1882, were necessarily made more than eighteen months ago, and were based on the supposition that there would be an average number of 875 patients to be supported. The whole number of patients remaining under treatment June 30, 1881, was 918; on September 30, 928; December 31, 932; and on March 1, 1882, 941. This very considerable increase in numbers could hardly have been anticipated, but the great advance in the prices of provisions, amounting to fully twenty-five per cent., of the prices then ruling, on such staple articles as meats, butter, flour, grain, fish, and vegetables, was due to causes that certainly could not have been foreseen. The whole amount appropriated for the support of the hospital in the sundry civil bill was $155,000 ;in the District bill $40,000; the amount received from all other sources (estimated) $6,847.46, making a total of $203,847.46 available for support. At the close of the present month there will have been expended, as nearly as can be ascertained, $168,479.98, leaving available from all sources $35,367.48 for the remaining three months of the year. Estimating that the expenditure for that quarter will not exceed the average of the three previous ones it amounts to $56,159.99, leaving to be provided for a probable deficiency of $20,792.51.

As in the matter of food and clothing, the hospital has no power to suspend operations when the appropriation is exhausted, this deficiency, which could not be auticipated when the regular estimates were made, is respectfully submitted at this time. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. W. GODDING,

Superintendent. The Hon. SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR.

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